10 Signs the Party’s Over

Most of us like a good party. There’s just something in our DNA that seems to make us enjoy hanging out with good people, having good fun, and not doing any work. Here in Los Angeles in particular, partying can sometimes feel like it comes with the territory of being a young man in one of the nation’s busiest cities– and there’s no denying that a good party can often seem like a great way to meet new people, make new friends, and unwind.

For many of us, though, partying could also spell danger– especially when it involves drugs and alcohol. When we begin abusing alcohol and drugs all in the name of a good time, what seemed to us to be innocent fun could quite quickly descend into something much worse.

While it is true that addiction treatment centers and sober living homes like The Last House are well-equipped to help us beat addiction, being able to identify the warning signs that tell us our “good time” may be putting our lives in jeopardy can ensure we get the help we need as soon as possible.

There’s nothing like a good Los Angeles party– but we don’t need drugs or alcohol to help us enjoy ourselves.

How can young men realize the party’s over?

As young men, it can sometimes feel like the luxuries we get to enjoy are few and far between. Between providing for our families, taking care of our parents, and handling our responsibilities, partying can almost seem like a saving grace after a tough day, a long week, or just hours of sitting in Los Angeles traffic.  When we drink too much or use any drugs, however, we’re not saving ourselves from anything. In fact, we could be putting our lives at risk.

A telltale sign that the party’s over is when we continue our substance use even after clearly experiencing negative consequences as a result. The National Council on Drug and Alcohol Independence names personal health, relationships, and jobs as the first three areas in our lives that we may see suffer from sustained substance abuse. Perhaps we’ve partied hard every weekend for a month straight, and noticed that our spousal relationship has become more volatile, received warnings from our bosses regarding our performance, or even started experiencing physical signs of strain like frequent headaches or nausea. If these indicators aren’t enough to get us to stop using, we may need to consider addiction treatment options.

Another sign that we may need help is when we find ourselves passing up opportunities to engage in other activities that don’t involve drinking or using substances. Medical News Today coins this action “recreational sacrificing.” There’s a good chance that substance use has begun to take over when activities we would have enjoyed or attended without question in the past have now become activities that we excuse ourselves from more often than not. With the amount of activities we can enjoy on any given day here in Los Angeles, if partying with drugs and alcohol seems to be the only thing of any interest to us anymore, getting sober likely needs to be a priority.

Tolerance levels are also vital indicators that addiction isn’t far down the road. As we continue to use drugs or alcohol, our bodies get used to their presence and begin to demand more in order to achieve the same highs. Where three tequila shots may have gotten us drunk a few months ago, we may now need double to achieve the same effect. As young men, the negative repercussions of tolerance are two-fold. Not only do increased tolerance levels indicate a need for addiction treatment– they also spell danger for our liver and bodily functions. The more of a substance we consume, the more damage it does to our bodies.

What we choose to sacrifice in order to use can also be a warning sign of serious trouble. According to a study found in the scientific journal Psychopharmacology, as we become addicted to a substance, our brains actually become rewired to take incredibly large risks and make incredible sacrifices in order to maintain access or a supply to that substance. If we find ourselves gambling away cab money to get one more drink– knowing we have no other way to get back home through busy Los Angeles traffic– an addiction treatment plan may be right for us.

Other signs that substance use has become a problem include going from casual partying to feeling like we need a substance to survive or deal with our problems, making excuses when others attempt to confront us about getting sober, manipulating others to supply or support our addiction, simply being unable to limit how much we use, and attempting to keep our use secret or hidden from those who care about us.

When we realize the party is over, addiction treatment and sober living facilities like The Last House are here to help young men focus on getting sober. Again, while everyone loves a good Los Angeles party, there can be a thin line between being the life of the party and risking our lives with substances.


The Last House is a men’s sober living facility in West Los Angeles that specializes in turning our young men into scholars and gentlemen. Through modalities that build confidence, camaraderie, and self-reliance, we help our men realize just how rewarding getting sober can be. Addiction treatment for young men isn’t always easy, but the journey to sobriety is always worth the bumps in the road. We know what our clients need to become the confident gentlemen they can be, and we don’t stop until they get there. Call 1-866-677-0090 to get started with The Last House today.

Serenity, Courage, Wisdom: Dissecting the Serenity Prayer Part I

“God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, courage to change the things I can, and wisdom to know the difference.”

For years, the twenty five words of the Serenity Prayer have acted as a guiding light for those of us battling addiction and our own inner demons. The words embody a few core principles of recovery, and many of us can even recite them by heart. It’s not the ease with which we can remember these words that makes them so powerful, however. It’s the meaning of the Serenity Prayer that makes it such a guiding light for us, and such an excellent tool to help us give context to why we take the actions we take in recovery.

To fully understand the meaning of the Serenity Prayer, we must first break it down into its three core concepts: serenity, courage, and wisdom.

When we ask God for serenity, we’re referring to inner peace, calm, and quiet. We’re asking him to help us let go of ego, anxiety, stress, and any other emotions or dispositions that can weigh us down and prevent us from seeing and feeling clearly. Serenity is a peace we can feel, and a comfort that relaxes us. We can’t control everything, and we can often change even less. Serenity helps us realize that that’s perfectly okay.

The meaning of courage in the Serenity Prayer is two-fold. We’re asking God to help us deal with the problems, inner maladies, and issues of life without relying on substances, and we’re also asking him to give us the strength to make the changes in our lives that can be hard to make. Getting sober isn’t easy, but with the courage to continue to better ourselves and make the changes we have to make for ourselves, we can keep pushing forward even when the road gets rough.

Finally, when we seek wisdom in the last part of the prayer, we’re seeking discernment. We won’t always know the meaning of everything that happens in our lives, but in praying the serenity prayer, we’re asking God to help us release judgment about ourselves, seek the right people for help making the right decisions, and understand what it is we need to change or accept. We’re asking for God to make our recovery path clear, and to give us the knowledge we need to make the choices that will determine our future.

At The Last House sober living facility, we understand the meaning and importance of the Serenity Prayer, and we encourage our men to apply its concepts within their recovery journeys. Serenity, courage, and wisdom are a powerful recipe for building powerful men. Call us at 1-866-677-0090 to see how we can help you today.

10 Benefits of Getting Sober Young

In his powerful song Starting Over, Macklemore croons some deep verses about recovery, relapse, and his journey to getting sober.

One particular verse stands out: “If I can be an example of getting sober, then I can be an example of starting over.”

As young men in recovery, getting sober is very much an opportunity for us to start over, as well. When we’re addicted, we can feel like our lives are falling apart. We lose friends, have little control over ourselves, and feel trapped in bodies that don’t feel like they belong to us. Getting sober is all about two things: teaching us how to get to the bottom of the issues that pushed us to using in the first place, and helping us welcome new life and new opportunities with open arms.

This is why here at The Last House sober living facility, we use every resource we can think of– including our prime location in Los Angeles– to help our men not just beat addiction, but truly embrace the idea of getting sober. Getting sober young means we still have our whole lives ahead of us, and that’s what makes the lessons we learn in sober living so important. We aren’t just learning to beat addiction, or how to reenter society. We’re learning how to live the lives of the men we always knew we could be.

What are the benefits of getting sober young?

Entering addiction treatment and sober living facilities as young men is a wise choice for a number of reasons, but the biggest reason might also be the most obvious: When young men enter addiction treatment, we’re saving ourselves a whole lot of future trouble. Even at our lowest point, our rock bottom is likely much higher than it would have been if we’d waited until later to start getting sober. In some cases, getting sober at a young age even gives us more time to repair some of the damage that might have been caused by our addiction. We could salvage our professional career, mend relationships, and get back on the right track, possibly without having to deal with the extra troubles that come with longer life.

The second benefit of getting sober young is that we have more opportunity to use our own experiences to help others. The young men in addiction treatment aren’t the only ones that have battled with addiction, but we might be the only ones that can connect with the other young men going through the same things we’ve been through. As young men, we can help others our age understand why they may need treatment, what addiction treatment is all about, and how empowering getting sober can be.

The third benefit of getting sober young, especially in Los Angeles, is that there’s so much more that we can enjoy. Los Angeles is the land of hopes, dreams, and everything in-between, and we have a front row seat to some of the most talented people, engaging events, and incredible ways of life in the world. When we get sober young, we can fill ourselves with the sights and sounds of a city teeming with things to do. Los Angeles offers endless opportunities to explore, create, and indulge ourselves, and being able to get sober as young men means we won’t have to miss a thing.

While we’re on the topic of Los Angeles, getting sober as young men here also means we have an ultimate platform to spread the power of the sober living community to as many as we can. With the stressors of fame, “making it big,” and competing for roles, gigs, and deals, many in Los Angeles turn to substances as a way to cope. As young men here, we’ve got the opportunity to meet people firsthand that are dealing with substance abuse, and connect with them to get them the help they need.

Another benefit of getting sober as young men is that we still have the time to truly explore ourselves and find our passions. When we’re addicted, most, if not all, of our time is devoted to using a substance. When we’re getting sober though, we have the time and motivation to find new activities to keep us busy, stimulated and engaged. As young men, the new activities that we begin to enjoy now in recovery can become passions that stay with us for a lifetime.

Other benefits of getting sober as young men include being able to forge lasting, meaningful relationships with others, being able to be present for life’s biggest moments, saving our bodies from future physical harm, being able to set an example for others that were in our shoes, and meeting some of the most genuine and supportive people we’ll ever know.

While ten are mentioned here, there are really countless benefits to getting sober as young men here in Los Angeles. At The Last House sober living facility, we help our young men realize these benefits and take full advantage of them. Life doesn’t end when we decide to get sober. It begins.

The Last House sober living facility in Los Angeles provides an environment that helps young men both get sober and become the best versions of themselves that they can be. Through addiction treatment modalities that foster brotherhood, courage, independence, and confidence, we teach our men how to grab life by the horns and own their recovery. When they graduate from the Last House, our young men don’t just live sober. They live powerfully. Call 1-866-677-0090 to get started with The Last House today.

Going to Sober Living for Addiction as a Young Man

We’re humans, and as humans, we’re conditioned to want more out of life. We want more fun, more adventure, more enjoyment. One of the incredible concepts about addiction recovery  is that it teaches us that we can have “more” and lead fulfilling lives while being sober and without using substances.

As a Los Angeles-based sober living facility, we understand that the world often defines being “sober” as a boring way to live life. Practically everything that’s considered “fun” seems to be tainted by drugs, alcohol, or both. It’s the way big industry makes money– and it’s also the reason why there are 278,544 drug and alcohol related deaths among men every year. Here at The Last House, we ascribe to a different idea of what living “sober” is. We believe that sober living means making a lifestyle change that transforms us into confident, independent men ready to make the most of our lives. We believe that by fostering brotherhood and community, the young men that come through our doors can take Los Angeles and the rest of the world by storm when they graduate. We believe that living sober is the absolute best version of life, and that nothing else really compares.

Getting sober at a sober living facility helps us learn how to deal with life’s challenges as they happen, with the support of brothers and mentors to help us make the right decisions. When we focus on getting sober, we realize that we don’t have time to think about “what we may be missing”– and we really don’t have any desire to. Truth be told, with countless activities here in Los Angeles, we actually find that we’re able to both be more productive men and have more enjoyable and fulfilling experiences when we’re not using substances.

Sober living isn’t just a halfway point between addiction treatment and life outside. With the resources provided and the tools created here in the sober living community, young men in Los Angeles, New York, DC, and all over the country are learning how to make the most of their lives by realizing just how much strength they have without substances. Getting sober is a journey, not a sentence. It’s the most rewarding action you can take for yourself as a young man battling addiction, and sobriety will open up a world of opportunity that you never thought possible.

Here at The Last House sober living facility, we believe that getting sober is a gift, and we teach our young men to embrace the possibilities of a sober life. Situated in sunny Los Angeles, we provide a number of activities and resources for our men to learn responsibility, accountability, independence, and brotherhood. When our men leave The Last House, they’re not just not using. They’re leading more fulfilling lives than they’d ever imagined. Call us at 1-866-677-0090 to get started with The Last House today.

When is an Addiction an Addiction?

Misuse/abuse. Regular use. Tolerance. Dependence. Addiction.

The stages of addiction might manifest differently based on the place or person, but misuse or abuse of drugs is still one of the most likely ways to start down the slippery slope towards addiction. In fact, the misuse or abuse of substances is so prevalent that the FDA indicates that “in 2017, an estimated 18 million people (more than 6 percent of those aged 12 and older)… misused [prescription] medications at least once in the past year.” While misuse is not the same as abuse, both actions are often our first foray into using drugs in ways that they aren’t supposed to be used. In misusing drugs, we’re using drugs for a purpose other than what they’re intended for, although we may not be necessarily be looking to get high. In abusing drugs, we’re using drugs for one alternative purpose: getting high.  

For some of us, misusing drugs for purposes that seem as innocuous as relieving a headache or getting over a cold can lead our bodies to crave more and more of the feeling the drug provides. In a very short matter of time, what was our attempt to self-medicate can lead right to regular use, tolerance, dependence, and then addiction. As for abusing drugs, if we’re willingly consuming substances with the purpose of getting high, then there, too, is only a matter of time before addiction becomes a real threat.

How is addiction defined?

Because misuse and abuse of drugs are not the same, yet often used interchangeably, it follows that many of us might also be confused as to how the other stages of addiction are defined.

To start, regular use is best defined as the point in which we begin to display a pattern of use. If we misused a prescription drug once, say for a headache, and liked the feeling, we may do it again– though this time not so much for the pain as for the feeling we get from it. Later on, we may try it once more. Eventually, we’re no longer using the drug for pain, but simply out of habit.

We might not be addicted yet, but we’ve reached the first phase– where drug use has gone from misusing to now using consistently.

At the next phase is tolerance. When we’re becoming tolerant of a drug, we find that we need more and more of it to obtain the same high that we used to get from a much smaller amount of it. If we abused a prescription drug just for the thrill of it the first time, because we liked it a little the second time, and maybe because we wanted some more the third time, by the time we reach tolerance, we’ve built up a habit of using the drug and our system now needs more in order for us to feel it. As we increase the amount of the drug we use, some of us actually begin to feel like we can operate even with a large amount of it in our system. This is why this stage can also be called the “risky use” stage. We can, in effect, become so used to having large amounts of the drug in our system that we feel like there’s nothing in our system at all. Some of us get behind the wheel, attempt to go to work, and exhibit outwardly dangerous behavior due to the drug’s now habitual place in our system.

Following tolerance is dependence, which is when our bodies begin to enter periods of withdrawal if we don’t have access to the drug we’ve misused or abused. Withdrawal is a combination of physical and mental symptoms that can be relatively mild or life threatening. The severity of withdrawals often depends on the drug, the user, and how long the drug has been in the system. When we’re dependent on a drug, we haven’t quite reached the stage of complete addiction, but we are dangerously close to it.

Finally, addiction follows dependence. What makes addiction different than the other stages is that addiction is a mental disease. Addiction results from a person taking a drug repeatedly, but the telltale sign of addiction is when that person cannot stop taking it. A great definition of addiction is that it is a state “marked by a change in behavior caused by the biochemical changes in the brain after continued substance abuse.” Unlike dependence, where we exhibit physical distress when we try to stop using, tolerance, where we need more of a drug, or regular use, where we’ve first started a habit, addiction is the culmination of all of the above. Using the drug becomes our main priority, at the expense of anything and everything that may get in our way. When we reach the point of addiction, whether our drug use started as a result of abuse or misuse becomes secondary. At this point, professional help is highly recommended to help get us on the right track to recovery.

Defining when addiction starts can be difficult, but at The Last House sober living facility, we help our men conquer addiction once and for all. We believe that addiction is wholly treatable, and that the sober living community can help men identify the underlying issues behind why they misused or abused a drug in the first place. We focus on brotherhood, unity, and responsibility here– traits that, when combined, can help a man transform into a better version of himself than he ever thought possible. Call 1-866-677-0090 to get started with The Last House today.

Being a Young, Sober Man in Los Angeles

Los Angeles. The home of film, dreams, beautiful people, and activities galore. Being a young, sober man in Los Angeles means tons of exciting opportunities to explore, mature, and strengthen our independence. After all, there’s no better way to enjoy the City of Angels than with a clear mind and a sense of adventure.

Here at The Last House sober living community, we help our men make the most of the opportunities Los Angeles offers by arranging social engagements like sober parties, service
events, conventions, fellowships and mandatory house outings, all designed to help us learn how to face common challenges with the support of our peers.

As a young, sober man in Los Angeles, the city is your oyster, and we help you find new ways to make your mark on life. As strong, independent men, we’re designed to be so much more than what addiction wants us to be. It’s the skills we learn, the passions we find, and the activities we enjoy in sober living that help us become the best versions of ourselves.

Some of the sober activities we enjoy here at The Last House on a sunny Los Angeles day include yoga, morning meditation, and surfing. On weekly outings, we like to mix it up with activities like golf, restaurant outings, and a skiing trip every once in a while.

Getting sober in Los Angeles starts with a mindset, and the sober living community that we foster here helps our men see sobriety as not just avoiding alcohol and substances, but as a new way to look at life. Every activity we enjoy ties us to something deeper– be it a sense of brotherhood, renewed confidence, or strengthened independence.

The activities Los Angeles offers don’t serve as mere distractions from drinking or using, but become new ways for us to exercise our passions and stimulate our interests. With the right mindset and a community of brothers behind us, we can make the most of young, sober life here in Los Angeles– because every day can be a new adventure.

Here at The Last House sober living facility, the young men that we work with learn just how fun getting sober in Los Angeles can be. Through the activities they enjoy at our sober living facility, they form powerful bonds with brothers, strengthen their self-confidence, and become independent men that will let nothing stand in the way of living their best lives.  Call us at 1-866-677-0090 to get started with The Last House today.

Misuse versus Abuse: Understanding Addiction

When it comes to drug use, there’s often one question that’s commonly asked: is drug misuse the same as abuse?

In short, no. Both are unique issues that come about in different ways. However, both drug use and drug abuse can lead to addiction if not corrected as soon as possible. Fortunately, correcting drug misuse and drug abuse is possible once we identify either in our lives.

What’s the difference between drug use and drug abuse?

According to the FDA, the difference between drug misuse and drug abuse “mostly has to do with the individual’s intentions or motivations.” With drug misuse, a person may improperly take a drug with the purpose of self-medicating. Let’s say you have a headache, for instance, and ask a friend for a prescription pain reliever. Without your own prescription for the drug, you’re misusing it, even if it seems like you’re taking it for a legitimate purpose. When we treat ourselves, we’re not acting according to the directions of any medical provider, and the chances of incurring serious consequences increase.

Drug abuse, on the other hand, usually relates to taking a drug with the sole purpose of achieving a high or euphoria. More often than not, drug abuse involves taking higher doses of a drug than what has been prescribed, and specifically looking to get some sort of pleasurable result from it.

Whether abusing or misusing drugs, both actions are so dangerous because they involve taking a substance without medical oversight to guide us. Though taking prescription drugs always involves some sort of risk, the risks associated with a drug prescribed and managed by a healthcare professional are minimal compared to if it’s taken with no oversight. Additionally, when taking drugs as properly prescribed, the benefits far outweigh the risks.

If drug misuse and abuse aren’t the same, which one’s worse?

There is a huge problem with both drug misuse and abuse, and one isn’t worse than the other in the technical sense– primarily because both typically involve willfully using prescription medication in a way other than how it’s intended to be used. There’s no such thing as a “legitimate” reason to use drugs in a way that they aren’t supposed to be used. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, just one decade ago, “20 million persons in the United States age 12 or older had used prescription drugs nonmedically at least once in their lifetime, and 6.2 million had used them in the past month.” Whether misusing or abusing drugs, both can lead to dependence and addiction.

How can drug misuse be prevented?

The number one way to prevent ourselves from misusing drugs is to be sure that we are only taking medications that have been prescribed to us. Even if it seems innocuous enough to borrow a pain reliever here or there, prescription drugs, their combinations, and their dosages are carefully designed to cater to specific people for a variety of reasons. Some medications purely work with a certain blood type, or a certain fat to muscle ratio. Others have dangerous side effects that prevent them from being shared widely. Still others are prescribed to deal with a very specific set of issues or ailments. When we take drugs that aren’t ours, we’re playing the lottery with our lives, and the odds aren’t in our favor. If there is a drug that we think may benefit us, it’s always best to consult with a physician and let him/her make the call on the healthiest course of action for us, instead of taking things into our own hands.

As for misusing a drug that is prescribed to us, this can be prevented by carefully following the instructions given to us by our healthcare provider. If there’s a certain way that we’re supposed to take the drug, then that’s the only way we should take it. If there’s a certain amount of pills that are to be taken, then no more should be taken. When a physician tells us that our prescription is no longer needed, we should also make sure to properly discard of any leftover medication. If there are no specific instructions for discardal, the FDA recommends mixing the remaining medication with an undesirable substance, placing in an airtight container, and placing them in the trash.

How can drug abuse be prevented?

Because drug abuse is often more deliberate than misuse, the key to preventing it is to identify the reasons behind why we want to use, and fixing them. Going to a counselor or therapist is often a great way for us to learn how to work out the issues that may be going on internally or externally, and to learn how to channel negative energy into positive alternatives.

Though drug abuse and drug misuse are not the same, they can both lead to serious consequences that can turn deadly if we aren’t careful. Identifying and rectifying the issues that encourage us to abuse, and taking prescription medications only as directed can help prevent both misuse and abuse.

Here at The Last House sober living facility, we build men into champions of recovery by educating them and cultivating an environment where they feel respected, appreciated, and motivated. We believe that addiction is an illness that can be treated by educating the mind, stimulating the soul, and rebuilding the body. If you’re dealing with the effects of drug misuse or abuse, we encourage you to reach out at 1-866-677-0090 today.

Learning to Make Lemonade out of Lemons


Learning to Make Lemonade out of Lemons

Helplessness is a learned behavior– but it’s one that many of us, thanks to the power of addiction, learn all too well. The Big Book describes helplessness as the last step before we turn ourselves and addiction over to a higher power: “Having reduced us to a state of absolute helplessness, you now declare that none but a Higher Power can remove our obsession.” In treatment, we learn a number of strategies to help us defeat helplessness. These strategies include things like making amends, forgiving ourselves, and learning to dig deep inside of ourselves to uncover latent issues that may have contributed to our substance use in the first place. While we learn these strategies in treatment, there’s nothing like an environment that allows us to practice them firsthand, before diving into the real world on our own.

Sober living provides just the environment.

In sober living communities like the one The Last House provides, we truly believe that practice makes perfect, and that if we’re going to learn how to turn life’s lemons into lemonade, we’ve got to know the recipe first. Just as addiction “taught” us helplessness, we have to continue to teach ourselves to be resourceful, independent, and self-reliant, even after initial treatment. We have to learn that helplessness doesn’t define us, and that even if it’s a trait we acquired long before addiction or treatment, in no way do we have to be stuck with it.

The sober living community serves as a training ground for recovery warriors– or at least that’s how we see it. Men come into sober living communities like The Last House after treatment on a mission to better themselves, and we put them up to the challenge on a daily basis. We teach men to make lemons out of lemonade by providing them with the tools they need to see themselves not as recovered from an illness, but as conquerors.

In our eyes, the three concepts we champion in everything we do– unity, peer support, and life skills– stand at the intersection of helplessness and self-reliance, and learning them allows us to unlock our true potential as men. Consider these components the three ingredients in our “lemonade” recipe!

What does turning lemons into lemonade actually mean?

Addicted or not, post-treatment or in treatment, like throws a heck of a lot at all of us all the time. Bills, job struggles, issues with our kids, temptations, trust issues, missed dinner reservations (okay, maybe the last one isn’t quite so bad). The point is, we all have to deal with the rat race of life on a normal basis, and for those of us in recovery, each new curveball that life throws at us could present a bit of a challenge. Think about it: for many of us, before treatment, our go-to coping mechanism whenever we were faced with an obstacle might have been to use the substance we were addicted to. Now that we’ve conquered that addiction, we have to continue to learn how to fill that void with healthy strategies and habits that will help us turn life’s would-be challenges into opportunities to grow in recovery.

This isn’t an overnight process, and it takes a lot of additional practice and trial and error to get right, even after initial treatment. Sober living helps us learn these strategies by providing us with a template for success. Learning how to rely on and support others (unity), practicing practical life skills, and understanding the importance of having the right people around us (peer support) helps us learn how to turn life’s lemons into lemonade.

Understanding the three concepts

We say it all the time: no man is an island. Unity is a must in recovery, and it plays a particularly large role in helping us make the most out of situations we’re faced with post-treatment. As The Big Book says- “our common welfare should come first, personal recovery depends upon… unity.”

So, how’s unity help us make lemonade out of lemons? Because it gives us a brother to lean on when we need help. It allows to communicate our feelings, what we’re struggling with, and what we’re worried about. Unity teaches how to hold one another up, and to turn to others when we need help, instead of just relying on ourselves. As The Big Book says, “if we ever were to feel emotionally secure among grown-up people, we would have to put our lives on a give-and-take basis; we would have to develop the sense of being in partnership or brotherhood with all those around us.” Unity tells us it’s okay to get and receive help in our recovery journey, and knowing where and how to get help is a fundamental part of being able to make the most of life’s lemons.

As for learning life skills and the importance of peer support, the two practically go hand in hand. Learning life skills like accountability and responsibility helps breed confidence in us, and having peers around to support us in learning these things affirms that we’re going in the right direction. Confidence and affirmation in our progress reassures us that, when the time comes, we’ll be ready to handle anything life throws at us. Knowing that we have the skills to turn life’s lemons into lemonade–even if our stubborn minds are telling us we don’t– is a fundamental part of doing it!

The Last House is a premier men’s sober living facility in West Los Angeles that gives men the skills they need to turn life’s lemons into lemonade (and be gentlemen in doing it). Call us at 1-866-677-0090 to find out how we can help you today!

Sober Living After Graduation

Sober Living After Graduation

Who said the sober living community’s way of doing things had to stop after we graduated?

It doesn’t!

The purpose of sober living is to prepare us for those “what’s next?” moments of our lives. We all have them. Maybe we return home to find that things have changed, and we need to pivot to get it all together. Maybe we find that living on our own, even after sober living, presents some challenges we didn’t expect to face.

One of the best ways to cope with unforeseen circumstances in our home life is to go with what we know: the sober living way. In sober living, we learn unity, self-reliance, and confidence through discipline, brotherhood, and collaboration with the men we live with. The lessons we learn along the way– things like punctuality, respect, and accountability– are all great ways to deal with almost everything life can throw at us afterwards, including what we may not think we’re prepared for.

The Big Book makes a very important point: “Until [we] could accept our alcoholism, we could not stay sober, [and] unless we can accept life completely on life’s terms, we cannot be happy.”

We accepted our struggle with addiction early on, and doing so allowed us to defeat it in treatment. Now, the only way to conquer life outside is to apply the same principles. We can’t expect that life will simply change for us, or that it won’t throw some things at us that may cause us to pause for a moment and think. We have to accept life on life’s terms, for all of the unsurety and lack of control it comes with. Once we do this, we can learn to navigate life with the skills we learned in treatment and sober living.

Sober living is like learning to swim, and life is like the sea. No matter the conditions, knowing how to swim allows us to conquer any body of water just alike. However, if we try to fight the sea, it’s easy to find ourselves struggling. The way to stay on top? Accept the sea for what it is. It’s powerful, it’s deep, and the current is strong. Then, let’s put on our goggles and not try to swim against it. Let’s swim with it.

The Last House is a men’s sober living facility in West Los Angeles. We help men backstroke through life’s oceans with ease, because we teach them how to swim in any environment. Life after treatment doesn’t have to just be lived. It can be conquered. Call 1-866-677-0090 to get started today!

Attitude Makes all the Difference


Attitude Makes all the Difference

Attitude is probably the single most important concept of recovery. Sound like a bold statement? Not so much! The Big Book mentions the word “attitude” almost forty times, with one key thread: that once we’ve truly recovered, “our whole attitude and outlook upon life will change.” Recovery isn’t just about getting over our addictions, or learning the skills we need to live life afterwards without going back to substances. It’s also about adopting an attitude and mindset that allows us to truly make the most out of life post-treatment. After all, what good is treatment if we only return to life as hollow shells, too scared or timid to live to the fullest, not enjoying ourselves but merely existing?

In sober living, much like the real world, attitude determines our altitude. As a midpoint between treatment and life on our own, sober living communities are designed to teach us how to adopt the attitudes that will benefit us the most after graduation. Many of us mistakenly assume that a successful treatment process automatically means an easy, smooth transition to life afterwards, but this simply isn’t the case!

Why is attitude so important?

Remember the little engine that could? “I think I can, I think I can, I think I can” went all the way up the hill with nothing but willpower. We can all take a lesson or two from this popular children’s story– even if it is so old our kids can barely remember it. Attitude, as The Big Book puts it, helps us see “immediate and practical results”– especially when we adopt the right one. With the right attitude, steps that may seem difficult post-treatment become a challenge, instead of an obstacle. As it pertains to sober living, the right attitude allows us to continue to learn about ourselves, diagnose our strengths and weaknesses, and improve who we are as men, without getting caught in a slippery pride pit. If that isn’t enough, attitude is so important because it’s such a fundamental part of our development in recovery! As The Big Book puts it: “To get over drinking (read: any addiction) will require a transformation of thought and attitude.” You can’t get very far in recovery without the right attitude, and even if you somehow manage to get through initial treatment without a significant change in attitude, it will have to change quickly post-treatment in order for you to see any real results. Remember, recovery is a lifelong process. Attitude only gets more important as you progress!

How does sober living change my attitude?

When we’re addicted to something, it can be hard for us to see past what we crave. We often find that doing the things we used to love doing becomes impossible, and that our lives transition to being solely at the whim of the substance we use. Through addiction treatment, we learn to regain control over our lives and rebuild the confidence that our addiction took from us, but only to the extent that the treatment facility can provide. With both inpatient and outpatient care, we learn how to regain confidence and control over our lives, but we don’t always get as much practice with these things in the real world as we need. Because our attitudes are tied to not only what we think, but what we experience, this could make adjusting to life afterwards a bit more difficult.

Sober living picks us up where treatment ends, and provides an environment that allows us to get the real world experience we need in order for our attitudes to adjust. Here at The Last House, we encourage the men in our program to step outside of their comfort zones all the time. In doing this, we instill confidence and help them understand that life after treatment isn’t a scary place, or one where they won’t fit in– it’s one where they’ll excel. Positive affirmation combined with positive experiences makes a world of difference in attitude!

In sober living, we live by one simple rule: we want to have the ability to live the best life we possibly can after graduation, free of distractions, temptations, and, of course, substances. We don’t just wish that and leave it alone, though. It isn’t some lofty goal that we write above the stairway and pat everytime we leave the house. It’s something we actualize– and we do it in large part by attitude. Everyday we live to get one step closer to our goal, and we learn to rely on our brothers to keep us accountable and make sure we’re constantly moving forward. We don’t take no for an answer, and we build the confidence we need to not just fight our problems, but to conquer them. We become gentlemen, scholars, and world-changers right there in the community living room, or around the dining room table at evening dinner. When we go to work, it’s not just the tools of the trade that we carry with us– it’s also the attitude that today will be more, mean more, and achieve more than any other day we’ve seen.

In just about everything, attitude makes all the difference in the world. It’s the difference between fear and confidence, success and failure, and living life or letting it live you. With the right attitude, our best lives are always just ahead of us, and everyday is a great day to change the world.

The Last House is a men’s sober living facility in West Los Angeles with one goal– making you the best man you can be. Call us at 1-866-677-0090 to find out how we can help you today!