Success Story: Cole W

Recovery, let alone sobriety, can be quite the tricky topic to navigate.  Setting aside all the drastic life changes that will need to be made, figuring out how one can go about making these changes to get clean and sober is a whole other beast.  It won’t only be tough for the individual who will be trading in his life for a new one, it is challenging for all the loved ones involved; family, partners, friends.  All parties invested in this process ultimately want the same goal – for the individual to be happy, safe, self-sufficient, and truly free from the enslavement that drugs and alcohol bound over our loved ones for far too long.  But you may be asking yourself, “Where do I even start?  Is therapy the right answer?  What about a rehabilitation treatment center?  Will a 12-step program do the trick?”  These are all valid and vital questions that anyone entering recovery needs to be asking.  However, more important than the question, is the answer….

I can safely say, from my experience, that the one and only question that one needs to be asking is, what direction will provide myself (or whoever is losing their battle with addiction) the best chance for success.  When I say success. I’m not referring to business or their career, but success in life measured through happiness, healthy relationships, fulfilling work, and long-term sobriety.  My family and I are just like you and yours.  We really had no idea what to do.  In truth the only thing we knew for sure is that we could not sit back and do nothing.  My addition ran my life and was rapidly burning my life into the ground, and those closest to me were soon to be casualties that would be engulfed in the flames.  

Slightly backing up – a little background on me.  I grew up in Palos Verdes Estates – the southernmost part of Los Angeles County.  I was the oldest of two children – an 8-year gap separated my brother and I.  Up through high school, I excelled in my studies – achieving a 4.0 GPA, I played two varsity sports – baseball and soccer (one of which I captained) and was a member of the honor jazz band.  Ultimately, these things led me to getting accepted into a 4-year university – Cal Poly San Luis Obispo.  I don’t mention things these to pump my ego or boast, rather to show that one can have a lot of things going for them – and IT WILL NOT MATTER.  I had my fair share of “run-ins” during high school once I began partying socially during freshman year.  Well, truthfully – it started off as social, but rapidly progressed into daily alcohol and drug use.  I smoked weed, drank, popped all types of pain killers, benzos, barbs, snorted coke, etc.…which ultimately led to a couple arrests, couple suspensions and the list goes on and on.  Things only continued to get worse – in college the drug and alcohol use only progressed as did the consequences: DUI, kicked out of campus dorms, court-ordered community service, employment terminations and on and on.  My life was reduced to nothing.  I felt nothing – outside of never-ending pain, suffering, and bouts of depression that would only be temporarily alleviated by getting loaded.  Sure, I graduated college with my diploma, but I couldn’t support myself in the slightest.  Something had to give – and it sure wasn’t going to be drugs and booze….at least not yet.  I had met with therapists through the years, taken classes for DUI, but had never attended rehab or sober living and all that comes with it.  Hence, I had never experienced recovery.  This downward spiral continued on for a few more years.

Ultimately, at 25 years old with nothing to show for his life – I had reached that point, that breaking point, ‘the bottom’ that the A.A. rooms always talk about – I was sick and tired of being sick and tired.  It was time for a change.  I finally asked for help, but where does one even start.  My family and I did like any directionless family might do – we turned to good old Google.  Flooded with an exceedingly high number of detoxes, rehabs, and sober livings, to say we felt overwhelmed would be an understatement.  After numerous phone calls and hours of “picture surfing” online, my family and I settled on a rehab center in West Los Angeles.  The treatment center served its purpose.  It provided me with a snapshot of what a life without drugs and alcohol would look like.  More importantly, it separated me from the lifestyle; the drugs and alcohol, the poor company I kept, and the places that I hung out.  Having been removed from those elements I was able to gain a better sense of clarity for what I needed to do.  Before entering rehab, I had the preconceived notion I would simply return to work after finishing my 30-day treatment as if my life was cured and fixed for good in just one short month.  Let me tell you — that could not have been further from the truth.  I wanted to be clean and sober.  I needed to be clean and sober.  I wanted a better life for myself.  I wanted to be able to suit up and show up for my friends and family.  Yet, if I would have elected to return to my life so soon without developing the necessary skills and resources required, it would have surely ended in disaster.  This is when I made the best decision of my life and chose to enter sober living, specifically The Last House. 

Since I was not familiar with the recovery community, whatsoever, I had never heard of The Last House until I was in treatment.  A friend of mine I made while in rehab was planning on going to The Last House upon completion of his time there.  He, along with a few others in the sober community, told me tales of rigorous structure.  I felt scared, I felt intimidated, I felt like I didn’t need to attend such a program since this was a first go-around at sobriety.  However, for that exact reason, was why I needed to go to The Last House!  I needed to go to a place that would challenge me and force me to transform into the man I always knew I could be.  Of course, it would not be easy.  In fact, it would be quite the opposite.  It would take a lot of effort and energy to see the change I wanted in my life.  But what was I to do?  I wasn’t going on a vacation.  I wasn’t going to appease some external person.  First and foremost, I was going to continue my clean and sober lifestyle, but equally important – I was going to learn how to live a mature life filled with integrity and character.  

I clearly remember my first night in the house like it was only yesterday.  The entire car ride from rehab to The Last House, my body was tense and riddled with anxiety.  The worst expectations of what was to come were racing through my head.  What I was feeling emotionally could be likened to the feeling of sitting in the back of a cop car being driven to the station after committing a crime.  However, what my deceiving mind told me and what I was to experience over the next year were total opposites.  I was finally in a safe environment.  Sure, it was also structured, but most importantly, it was safe, which really alleviated the worries my parents had experienced for ten years running.  They could finally sleep soundly at night.  

Through this journey, the person I was and the way I was living was challenged every single day.  I was pushed to be the best version of myself; to finally after 25 years of living – become a loving son, helpful brother, and caring friend.  I was pushed to grow up and mature into the man I wanted and needed to be. Was the entire time I spent at The Last House easy?  Of course not, but was it worth it? ABSOLUTELY!  So, what all did The Last House do for me.  There is not enough space in this letter for me to rave about all of the benefits and positives I learned, but I can give a brief snapshot.  First off, I gained the basic, yet vital skills needed to lead a successful life.  I became punctual, thorough, honest, and accountable.  I can suit up and show up whenever I am called upon whether it be for my family or friends or for work.  I was introduced to A.A and therapy and now work a strong 12-step program daily to address my addiction and alcoholism along with heightening my emotional and mental sobriety.  I gained life-long friends whom I am still in regular contact with to this day.  Whatever twist and turn life may throw may I way – I am now able to navigate without having the need to turn to drugs and alcohol.

Upon graduating from The Last House.  I worked as a manger there for nearly two years before working as a manger over at Thrive Treatment for another two years.  Currently, I run the Supplies and Fulfillment team for a diagnostic laboratory here in Austin, Tx.  I met an incredible women in the rooms of A.A. and we are currently engaged and set to marry in March.  She has 4 years clean and sober while I eclipsed 5. Our entire apartment is clean and organized and the bills are all paid for mind you. I have a fantastic relationship with my entire family – mom, dad, and brother (who I have finally begun mentoring – which unfortunately was 26 years to late – but better late than never).  I have been able to travel both inside and out of the United States visiting numerous states in countries over these past 5 years.  I attend meetings regularly, sponsor other men in the program, and have gone through my steps a few times (currently on step 3).  At the end of the day, I am happy, self-sufficient, and ultimately alive!  My life is continuing to grow and expand, and I am fully looking forward to the future as I have some big dreams for my life – as you should as well!  None of this would have been possible without the support and guidance provided to me from The Last House. 

Success Stories: Jacob K

When I came into the last house, I was a shell of a human being. Even at three months sober I showed signs I would describe as feral and selfish tendencies. I came in, believing the world centered around me from the trauma. I experienced grandiose thinking and expectations I had of how the world should be. I came into the house terminally unique, vindictive and with a victim mentality. They were walls built up over the decades and a mask that I wore is heavy as iron. I did not see myself as worthy of a real life to which it took over three months of delusional thinking for a shift to begin. There was no white light experience, but rather a trial by fire. Slowly but surely I began to see life as a sober man was possible, and not just by abstaining from getting loaded. A thing that I never even considered, emotional sobriety. I began to embrace the concept of gratitude for what was in my life which were no longer material. As mentioned this was not an overnight procedure. Many times my thinking was challenged. Slowly but surely I began to show that I could be responsible. It was shown to me that it was no longer about me, but that I could help those around me. I noticed that it felt better to help then search out selfish actions. The world did not change, simply my views of it did  Glimpses of hope began to spring through each difficulty that was overcame. Life wasn’t happening to me, it was happening for me. The more I let go and let God everything became clear and my fears slowly subsided. A newfound confidence emerged with a moral compass that was no longer pointing to my wants emerged. Lastly, a feeling and belief I had long ago forgotten, hope.  I do not regret my past for it led me here. I have a newfound freedom in life, and for that I will always be grateful.

Success Stories: Ryan S

Before coming to the last house, I had no idea what it meant to maintain long-term sobriety. I was driven by the guilt and shame of my past, and the crippling anxiety that I would not be able to accomplish anything in my future. I had isolated myself from everything, and had no idea what the solution looked like. The Last House gave me something to believe in and slowly but surely my outlook began to change.  It taught me the importance of routine and what it actually took to have a good work ethic. The program helped me channel all of my energy to actually set and accomplish long-term goals. The entire process humbled me and brought me back to reality. I was shown how to participate in AA, how to be grateful for the little things, and what it meant to truly care for others. Last House gave me community and the right frame of mind to figure out what I want my life to look like and what is this going to take to achieve my goals.

What is Couples Rehab?

What is Couples Rehab?

In recent times, the number of couples struggling with drug or alcohol addiction has been on the increase. Married partners and cohabiting couples who share drug addiction often quarrel. They generally experience emotional distance and are emotionally disturbed in most instances.

Usually, members of such intimate relationships spend a lot of time influencing one another by taking drugs and alcohol. This results in a cycle of continuous substance use for stress relief and getting away from problems. Unfortunately, in worse instances, a couple’s drug addiction problems may go on to impact other members of the family.

The implication of being addicted to a substance and being around a partner who does the same is that dropping off the addiction can be more difficult. In addition, when couples influence their drug addictions in this manner, it becomes challenging for any of the partners to seek therapy as an individual.

Couples rehab has the means of breaking drug misuse cycles and helping struggling couples 

Contact The Last House today to learn more about our Los Angles sober living for men.

 

Can Couples Go to Rehab Together?

Therapists in couples drug rehab centers understand that couples with addictions sometimes fear not seeing their partners when treatment begins. As a result, most rehabs for couples are planned in a way that caters to the treatment of both partners simultaneously.

When rehab centers cater to the uniqueness of a couple and accommodate the needs of a relationship, partners have a feeling of not being alone. This improves the results of the recovery process as couples share more enthusiasm. Additionally, couples get to support one another and are dedicated to the recovery of their partners.

A couple’s rehab becomes the best option when both partners are committed to recovery. In addition, rehab for couples can extend into family therapy when couples have children who are impacted by drug misuse.

 

Is Couples Rehab Beneficial in Treatment?

Rehab for couples is beneficial because couples follow an addiction recovery program while strengthening their relationship. Drug recovery treatment for couples includes therapy like behavioral couple’s therapy and family therapy. These programs are geared towards abstinence as well as rebuilding relationships.

Let’s take a look at some of the benefits of rehab for couples:

  • Couples get to understand themselves better through the course of rehab programs
  • Couples navigate their recovery plans together while clearing assumptions and misconceptions
  • Rehab programs help couples to a sense of responsibility in maintaining their partner’s sobriety
  • When drug recovery is made with a loved one, the process becomes very stress-free
  • Recovery programs allow couples to discuss their addiction problems with other couples
  • Rehab centers usually have couples doing well in their recovery plans. This encourages newer couples
  • Couples get to improve their decision-making concerning finances, parenting, and other necessities.

When couples share recovery programs, they celebrate their successes with each sober milestone reached. Seeing progress in a partner strengthens the resolve to see through the recovery program. What better way to recover from drug addiction than to do so in the arms of a loved one who understands one best?

Couples attending rehab together must put in a great deal of work, commitment, and accountability to their partners. Yet, regardless of the couples rehab center, the goal is to ensure that couples become drug-free and return to safe and healthy lifestyles.

 

How to Find Couples Rehab Centers in Los Angeles

Having more awareness of having couples attend couples’ drug rehab centers, accessing rehab for couples is easy. Take the first step by informing your partner and planning to attend a competent rehab center for couples.

At Last House, we have an ideal setting for couples seeking therapy for drug misuse disorders. Since relationships differ, our structured sober living for men caters to the uniqueness of relationships by focusing on the underlying causes of addiction and structuring peculiar recovery plans.

Here in Los Angeles, we have two sober living homes open to help you and your partner recover. Our friendly staff teams are happy to welcome you into our couple-specific program. If you are struggling with addiction alone or with a loved one, call us. Recovery is only a step ahead. So reach out to us today for help with your addiction.

Success Stories: Alec B.

It’s hard to express in words how grateful I am for the Last House.  I mean, how do you describe how it feels to have your life saved, and your feelings toward those who saved you? In all likelihood, it’s probably something that only people who share similar experiences can understand. But I am certain that at the Last House, anyone struggling with addiction will have their best chance of experiencing what that feels like.

Before I entered the Last House in July 2021, I was completely broken, mired in the tail end of a multi-year downward spiral. Over the previous months, I had lost my high-paying dream job, lost my girlfriend, burned bridges with friends and family, and blew a small fortune on drugs, alcohol, and their accompanying activities. I had been homeless for a couple of weeks, staying at seedy motels and crashing at friend’s couches until they invariably kicked me out for stealing. My family wouldn’t talk to me.

In those days I often repeated to myself the Samuel Johnson quote, “He who makes a beast of himself gets rid of the pain of being a man.” What the quote leaves out, however, is that the pain of being a beast is infinitely greater than that of being a man. I wouldn’t say that I was human. I existed, but for the sole purpose of using. You could say that I was tired, lonely, hurting, scared, but the truth is I wasn’t, I didn’t even have the emotional vacancy for those feelings. Using was the only thing in my universe.

As my money and options dwindled, I was given a choice. Go the Last House or be homeless. Not being a particularly tough or street-savvy man, I decided I probably couldn’t manage on the tough streets of LA. But to say I was excited to be at the Last House would be a blatant lie. It seemed like hell. Too strict, too many rules, people telling me bluntly the ways in which I was hurting myself and those around me. Plus, I figured I was better than everyone around me. I had a master’s degree from Johns Hopkins and was only recently making well over a 100k working for the U.S. government in defense. What the fuck could this place tell me, I figured. I was, as I would later come to learn, blinded by both ego and insecurity, twin pillars upholding an emotional structure that told me I was not good enough.

But then, somehow, the miracle happened. The Last House began to click. In the structure, in the accountability, in the work, are lessons, key lessons. What does it mean to be a man, to be a man of integrity, to be able to show up for not just yourself but for your loved ones and community? What does it mean to meet your obligations, to rest your head at night on your pillow knowing that you tried your best to handle yourself the right way? What is it like to be honest, both with others and yourself? How does it feel to support others, and to be supported? To give, and not take? These were questions I had often wrestled with, but was never able to find an answer to, when I was using.

But at the Last House, these questions are not only asked of you, but answered, should you choose to do the work. And the reward is spiritual freedom, and so much more. While at the Last House I made a new family, learned how to conduct myself with dignity, learned how to love myself, and be there for others – things I had always wanted for myself but never had. Things that I am so grateful for today.

And, yes, eventually the material things did return as well. I now live in a fancy apartment again making lots of money. But truly, those things, while nice, are not what is important. The values, lessons, and relationships I formed while at the Last House, that is what is important.

So, to you newcomers of the Last House, hold on, stay a while. It will not always be easy, nothing important ever is, especially not getting sober. However, I can assure you that if you put your head down, and do the necessary work, the life waiting for you on the other side is beyond belief.

How to Stop Binge Drinking

How to Stop Binge Drinking

According to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, binge drinking is said to be when an individual’s blood alcohol content reaches .08, or roughly five drinks for men and four drinks for women, within a 2-hour period. Binge drinking can increase the chances of alcohol addiction and alcohol use disorder. In this article, we’ll examine what binge drinking is and how to can stop binge drinking safely.

 

What Is Binge Drinking?

Simply put, binge drinking refers to taking large quantities of alcohol within a short period. Binge drinking can occur in various situations, such as parties, social events, or bars.

When people drink large quantities of alcohol in a short period, it leads to an increase in blood alcohol concentration (BAC). Individuals with a BAC of 0.08% or higher are classified as legally impaired and not expected to drive.

While binge drinking may not be as severe as alcoholism, it still poses a problem and can be a warning sign of alcohol abuse. Binge drinking can also lead to dangerous and possible life-threatening issues.

While alcoholism is a constant addictive behavior, binge drinking is usually a one-off behavior. It can lead to an increased risk of liver problems, alcohol poisoning, high blood pressure, and digestive problems. It can also result in vehicle accidents, physical and sexual assault, and unintentional injuries.

If you or your loved one are in recovery from alcohol abuse, The Last House ensures a safe, fun, program-oriented setting where residents can find purpose, progress, and build a foundation for a life that is not only free of drugs and alcohol but flourishing in all aspects.

Contact us today to learn more about our structured sober living for men in Los Angeles.

 

Is Binge Normal?

While binge drinking isn’t normal, it is one of the most common and deadly patterns of excessive alcohol use. While binge drinking differs from alcohol addiction, it is still a harmful behavior that can seriously affect your physical and mental health. Binge drinking is more common among adults and is highly prevalent among college students. Binge drinking on a regular basis can result in alcohol use disorder.

Call The Last House today at 1-866-677-0090 and learn more about our Los Angeles sober living program.

 

How to Stop Binge Drinking

If you or your loved one is consuming large quantities of alcohol regularly and you want to stop, there are certain steps you can take to achieve this. First, you can create a plan to cut down on drinking or stop drinking entirely. For example, you can restrict yourself to 2-3 drinks at most whenever you want to drink, which should not be frequent.

You can also inform your family and friends to have some form of accountability and support. Also, professional help, such as rehab facilities and support groups can help to curb binge drinking. This is the best way to stop binge drinking.

The Last House offers a safe and secure environment and treatment for individuals suffering from alcohol and drug abuse.

 

How to Recover from Alcohol Abuse?

Alcohol abuse is a spectrum of harmful drinking behaviors, including binge drinking and alcohol dependence. Alcohol abuse poses different types of negative effects on physical health, mental health, and social well-being.

There are certain steps to take to recover from alcohol abuse. Some individuals who abuse alcohol may be able to stay away from alcohol or reduce the amount and frequency. Family support and accountability can also help in recovering from alcohol abuse.

However, professional treatment is one of the most effective ways to recover from alcohol abuse. Professional treatment can include medication, therapy, support groups, and natural therapies.

 

The Last House Offers a Recovery Program

The Last House is a top-rated sober living facility in Los Angeles with the goal to create an environment that promotes long-term recovery. The Last House offers a safe and secure environment and treatment for individuals suffering from alcohol and drug abuse. Contact The Last House today at 1-866-677-0090 for a consultation.

What Are the Types of Group Therapy?

What Are the Types of Group Therapy?

Several patients get psychotherapy from one or more mental health professionals during each session in group therapy. Group therapy can shorten wait times and provide access to mental healthcare for more individuals. While some people primarily use group therapy, others also participate in individual treatment sessions. 

Group therapy is one of the most acceptable methods to maintain your ongoing rehabilitation since long-lasting healing occurs in a community. Group therapy aids in practicing the fundamental life skills needed for persons in recovery to care for themselves daily correctly. 

Additionally, they support our comprehension of the constructive communication techniques we need to build new connections and mend any relationships we may have harmed by our destructive conduct. In this article, we’ll discuss types of group therapy, why it is essential, and how to find group therapy programs in Los Angeles. 

The Last House Sober Living is a network of transitional living homes providing structured sober living for men in Los Angeles. Long-term recovery is encouraged by the atmosphere our sober homes foster. This program lays the groundwork for a new life filled with excitement and joy while remaining sober.

 

What Are the Types of Group Therapy?

Group therapy comes in various forms, and each group’s treatment plan is unique. We will discuss five of the most general categories in the following sections.

Psychoeducational Groups

The main goals of psychoeducational group therapy are to inform participants of their problems and give them new coping mechanisms. These teams typically concentrate on a particular illness, including drug use disorder, anxiety, or phobias.

Skill Development Groups

Groups that specialize in skills development introduce and enhance the abilities individuals need to deal with certain mental health disorders. Aspects of psychoeducational groups may be included in these groups. The members’ behavioral and cognitive resources must be strengthened to support their ability to make wise decisions and stay out of dangerous circumstances.

Groups for Relapse Prevention

After successfully completing a drug treatment program, a person could believe that their road to recovery is done. In reality, once a person returns to their regular daily activities, the true job of rehabilitation starts. Drug users are most vulnerable in the early stages of recovery. Therefore, newly sober individuals must receive the extra assistance they need to make this transition as painless as possible.

Relapse prevention support groups are a mainstay of aftercare programs and are created to assist clients in identifying the environmental triggers that may cause them to relapse. Clients in these groups concentrate on improving their coping mechanisms and heavily rely on peer support, ongoing participation in 12-step groups, and educational programs to help them comprehend the chronic addiction condition.

Interpersonal Groups

Social connections, including how much support you receive from others and how these interactions affect your mental health, are the subject of interpersonal groups.

Behavioral and Cognitive Groups

The goal of cognitive behavioral group therapy is to remodel the ideas that underlie harmful behaviors in an individual. For instance, cognitive behavioral treatment programs for drug use disorders start by recognizing the circumstances and surroundings that serve as catalysts for addictive behavior. Members can create management measures to promote lower use once they have this information.

 

Why Is Group Therapy Important?

Researchers evaluated and studied the efficacy of a 7-week group therapy approach for treating depression that was web- and mobile-based. Participants reported considerable improvements in their general health and depression symptoms. Over the three-month follow-up period, these improvements stayed steady.

According to a piece in the American Psychological Association’s Monitor on Psychology, group therapy is effective for the following issues according to standards set by the Society of Clinical Psychology (APA Division 12):

  • Bipolar illness
  • Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD)
  • Panic attack
  • Social anxiety
  • Substance use disorder

There are several benefits of group therapy. Some of these benefits are listed below:

  • Encouragement, Safety, and Support

People who participate in group therapy might benefit from the encouragement and support of their fellow group members. Participants can see that others in the group are experiencing the same thing, which might make them feel less alone.

  • Understanding Social Skills

Working with a group allows the therapist to see each person’s reactions to others and social behavior up close. The therapist may provide each client with helpful comments based on this data.

  • Positive Support System

Groups can provide a sounding board and a network of support. Other group members frequently assist you in developing specific ideas for addressing a challenging circumstance or life problem and hold you accountable along the process. Listening and talking to others regularly also aids in putting your issues in perspective.

At The Last House, we aim to offer residents a secure, enjoyable, program-focused environment where people with substance abuse may find meaning in their lives. This will ensure they make progress and lay the groundwork for a life that is not just drug- and alcohol-free but also prosperous in all other respects. 

 

How to Find Group Therapy Programs in Los Angeles

Our staff members have a wealth of information with years of experience, educational backgrounds, counseling certifications, and a variety of specializations in health, wellness, and employment services. You can contact us today to learn more about how to find the best Los Angeles sober living for men.

What Are the Signs of a Cocaine Addict?

What Are the Signs of a Cocaine Addict?

Most people have an idea about what some drugs and alcohol can do to a person and how becoming addicted can affect a person’s life. Not everyone knows, though, how to recognize the signs that a person is suffering from a particular addiction like cocaine. The best way to get a person the help they need is by being able to tell when they have a problem. For a powerful drug like cocaine, there are many dangers of continued use. This means that the sooner you can recognize that a person has a problem, the better it is, and the more likely you are to save them from harm.  

The Last House is a sober living facility for men who have completed addiction treatment. We understand the danger that cocaine addiction poses and understand the importance of professional treatment in getting sober. We believe everyone deserves to live a life clean of cocaine. In this post, we are going to discuss the drug cocaine, the signs of a cocaine addict, cocaine addiction symptoms and what harm they can cause long term, and how to find cocaine addiction treatment in Southern California.

 

What is Cocaine? 

Cocaine is a drug derived from the coca plant that has been used for centuries due to its anesthetic and energy-giving properties. It is classified as a stimulant drug and is considered highly addictive. The drug was used in various parts of the world for medicinal purposes and at one time by medical personnel as both a treatment for various conditions and as an anesthetic for surgery and other procedures. 

It was not until the mid-20th century that the addictive properties of the drug were identified, and the drug was made illegal. The modern form of the drug appears as a yellowish or white powder that is sometimes sticky or gummy and sometimes cut with various other substances to dilute it. Most often, it is smoked or snorted though it can be liquified and injected or mixed with other substances to create different drugs. 

Cocaine is primarily used as a party drug though habitual everyday use is possible for those that become addicted. Many people use the drug due to the energy-giving effects that it possesses. It also suppresses the appetite and improves concentration as well as the ability to consume alcohol, which can make using the drug even more dangerous.

 

What Are the Long-Term Effects of Cocaine Use? 

Like most drugs, some long-term effects go along with cocaine use. All addictive drugs alter the body’s chemistry. However, cocaine works on the reward and stress centers in the brain. Over the long term, it is harder for a person to derive pleasure from activities because the brain produces fewer of the necessary “reward” chemicals. 

At the same time, long-term cocaine use increases the body’s stress response, making a person easily aggravated and more prone to stress over issues that otherwise may not bother them. Over an extended period, a person’s tolerance also increases, meaning they may need more cocaine to keep from experiencing withdrawal, leading to higher doses more frequently. 

 

What Are the Signs of a Cocaine Addict? 

Some behavioral and physical signs of cocaine use can tell you if a person is abusing cocaine and needs treatment. 

You may notice increased irritability and restlessness while a person is on cocaine, as well as fast-talking, hyperactivity, mood swings, and trouble concentrating as the drug wears off. You may also notice constant sniffling, a white film or powder around the nostrils, and even lesions in the nostrils. Prolonged use may lead to a loss of sense of smell and even a deviated septum. 

Depending on how a person uses cocaine, you may see other signs, such as marks at sites of injection, redness, and swelling. As we mentioned, mixing cocaine with other drugs can also have its own signs and symptoms. 

 

How to Find Cocaine Addiction Treatment in Southern California

While The Last House is a sober living home in Los Angeles, we also have access to other resources, including our clinical sober living campus in Santa Monica, an outpatient treatment facility for drug addiction. If you know someone who is suffering from cocaine addiction, contact The Last House. 

After completing their treatment program, they will also be eligible for our sober living facilities and the programs we offer. Whether they need continued support or are just trying to rebuild their life before returning to the ordinary day-to-day, The Last House is here to help with programs and even family support. 

Don’t let a cocaine addiction ruin your life; contact The Last House today.

How to Hold a Drug Intervention

How to Hold a Drug Intervention

Anyone who has ever had a loved one with addiction knows how difficult it can be seeing them struggle with their addiction and the strain it puts on relationships, finances, and just about every other part of a person’s life. However, one of the most complex parts of seeing a loved one with an addiction is knowing how to get them the help they need. There are many reasons why an addict doesn’t get the help they need; they don’t know how, they’re afraid, they don’t think they have a problem, or they don’t have the support they need to go through the process. In these cases, a drug addiction intervention is the best option to help your loved one get the help they need to get clean and sober and start rebuilding their life. 

The Last House is a Los Angeles sober living program that provides a safe place for those that have been through addiction treatment and want to continue rebuilding their life after addiction has destroyed it. We believe everyone should have access to the treatment they need to get and stay sober. In this post, we are going to discuss drug addiction interventions, what it is and why addiction interventions are crucial to the recovery process.

 

What is a Drug Intervention? 

A drug intervention is a meeting held by the friends and loved ones of a person suffering from addiction. The purpose of an intervention is to get a person suffering from an addiction to realize the harm their addiction has caused and seek help by going into treatment. A drug intervention can take different forms, but the end goal remains the same, to break the cycle of addiction. 

It’s called an intervention because a group of people is intervening or stepping in the way of the addiction to try and get a person some help. The way it typically goes, one person leads the intervention, including choosing an appropriate venue, gathering the rest of the friends and loved ones, and setting up the actual intervention. 

During the intervention, friends and family take turns speaking, sometimes reading from a script or writing a letter to the person with the addiction, explaining how the addiction has hurt them and the danger that it poses. Each person expresses their concerns and why the addict should get help while offering love and support. Once everyone has spoken, the addict is typically given an ultimatum to get help. 

If the intervention is successful, the family and friends work together, and the addict enters a treatment program for their specific addiction. Holding an intervention can drastically improve the odds of success of someone going to treatment and getting the help they need to get and stay sober for the long term. By building a strong support network, it is much more likely that the person will complete treatment and be able to avoid relapse. 

 

How to Hold a Drug Addiction Intervention

Putting together a drug intervention on your own can be a difficult task, but there are a few key things to remember when planning one. 

First, it’s essential to pick the right location, a neutral but safe place for all parties involved, including the person for whom the intervention is being held. It can be a relative’s home or a specific venue that is rented out for the purpose of the intervention. 

Second, it is important to gather everyone together and rehearse what they will say and how the intervention will proceed. It is important to remain supportive and caring throughout the process while also being firm about the consequences of the addiction and the potential repercussions if the person does not go into treatment. 

Lastly, suppose you think that you need help planning the intervention. In that case, it is always a good idea to hire a professional interventionist to help plan and execute the drug intervention to ensure it is a success. 

 

How to Get a Loved One Help With a Drug Intervention 

If you think your loved one needs help, an intervention is a right choice. If you have trouble putting together an intervention on your own, it’s important to reach out to the addiction services in your community to get professional assistance. 

The Last House is a sober living home for men that is available for those who have completed treatment, but we have a wide array of resources that clients and their families can access to get help and support. 

The benefit of a sober living home in Los Angeles is that it gives them a place to live while they rebuild their lives after completing treatment but before returning to a normal day-to-day life. We offer programs for drug addiction and even have a phase out program for those who are ready to transition back into society after sober living. 

If you have a loved one with an addiction, don’t wait to get help; call The Last House today and let us help you help them.

What Are the Signs of Opioid Abuse?

What Are the Signs of Opioid Abuse?

Most people have heard of opioids and know that opioid addiction is a significant issue. One of the biggest problems with the opioid epidemic is that many people become addicted thanks to prescription medications. Without knowing the signs of opioid abuse, it can be hard to tell if someone has an opioid addiction. In some cases, people who aren’t abusing opioids, but are simply taking them for a prolonged period can wind up addicted without knowing it. 

The Last House believes that everyone deserves a chance to live free of drug addiction. We understand what a problem the opioid epidemic has become and that getting your loved ones the help they need is critical. In this post, we are going to look at signs of opioid use, opioid addiction signs, and how to find treatment for opioid addiction.

 

Which Drugs Are Opioids? 

Opioids are derived from the seeds of the poppy plant. They are widely used in medications that treat chronic and severe pain. Opioids come in a variety of forms and can be both natural and synthetic. 

Most opioids are in drugs such as those of the oxy family of drugs and a few other popular medications. Heroin is in the opioid family as well. Not only these medications, but there are now incredibly strong synthetic opioids such as the drug fentanyl, which is both a prescribed medication, and a derivative street drug that has proven to be incredibly deadly. 

Opioids are all incredibly addictive due to two primary factors. The first factor is due to the fact that opioids affect both the brain and the central nervous system. Over time, opioids change the chemical makeup of the body, changing the way the body and brain react to pain and causing what is known as chemical dependency. Chemical dependency gradually shifts until a person becomes completely addicted to the drug. 

The second reason many people become addicted to the drug is that they start to enjoy the way the drug makes them feel. In particular, some opioids are known to cause a calming and relaxing or even euphoric sensation that some feel is a “high.” They begin to take more and more of the drugs or even change the way they ingest the drug in order to get this feeling.

 

What Are the Signs of Opioid Abuse 

Like most drugs, there are certain signs to look out for that you can use to tell if someone has an opioid abuse problem. 

Because most opioids that are widely available are prescriptions one thing to look out for is a change in the amount a person is taking, such as taking more than prescribed and going back too often for refills. They may also change the way they take the medication, such as changing from swallowing pills to crushing and snorting them. This is a clear sign that they may be abusing the drugs. 

Other behavioral signs include secrecy and paranoia over their drug use. Distancing themselves from loved ones and favorite activities is another trait, as is neglecting responsibilities. 

A person may even wind up in financial and legal trouble due to drug-seeking behavior. 

Emotional signs include anxiety, depression, mood swings, fear, and anger. They may flip from one mood to another, especially if pressed about drug use.

 

Are There Treatment Programs For Opioid Addiction? 

Yes, you can find opioid-specific treatment programs that include personal care and medically assisted detoxification at a treatment center near you that work for opioids. However, once treatment is complete, that doesn’t mean the fight with addiction is over. 

That’s when you need The Last House. The Last House offers men’s sober living in Los Angeles for those in recovery. We have multiple programs available for those just ending treatment, all the way to those that are ready to phase out of the program to ensure that everyone has the help they need to return to a life free of opioids. 

Contact The Last House today to learn more about our Los Angeles sober living locations and get help with your recovery.