Suboxone Abuse

suboxone abuse

WHAT IS SUBOXONE ABUSE

Opioid addiction continues to be a real problem within the U.S. There is a heavy abuse of opioid and heroin prescription medications such as OxyContin, Morphine, and Vicodin. Suboxone may be offered to people who have abused opioids in order to reduce cravings and withdrawal symptoms and at the same time discourage the improper use of opioid drugs. Even though taking Suboxone is beneficial during the detox treatment phase, there is a great probability for Suboxone abuse and this may hinder long-term recovery.

What is Suboxone Treatment?

Persons who are recovering from heroin and various opioid drugs are prescribed Suboxone. Suboxone’s two active ingredients, naloxone and buprenorphine, both act together to get rid of the “high” gotten from opioids, reduce cravings for opioids, and reduce withdrawal symptoms. Sadly, only the physical dependence of opioids are addressed by Suboxone. Suboxone doesn’t address the psychological problems which come as a result of addiction and can be abused.

What is Suboxone Abuse?

At the creation of Suboxone, the presence of the two active ingredients, naloxone and buprenorphine made any thoughts of abuse seem unlikely. This is not true. Suboxone has the potential to be abused and it’s very addictive. A person may tend to be addicted to Suboxone, even if it is used following the prescription. Many at times, this leads to a person staying on Suboxone for ages and having severe withdrawal symptoms when trying to keep off the drug. Persons who abuse Suboxone usually take an overdose so as to get high. Persons that abuse Suboxone usually use different ways of administering it such as: taking frequent doses, using water to dilute the drug and then injecting it, grinding pills and inhaling them, and chewing pills and swallowing them.

Adverse Effects of Suboxone Abuse

– Fever

– Poor Memory

– Diarrhea

– Nausea/Vomiting

– Slurred speech

– Muscle Pain

– Insomnia

– Drowsiness

– Increased sweating

– Abdominal Pain

– Depression

Effects and Dangers of Suboxone

When Suboxone is taken and used as prescribed, it is able to reduce cravings, withdrawal symptoms and has the ability to stop improper use. Even though Suboxone can be beneficial for a number of persons during the detox process, it can also be used improperly. The improper use of Suboxone may give rise to serious health dangers. Even when taken following prescriptions, Suboxone can be addictive. Improper use of Suboxone may lead to overdose, death or addiction. Persons who abuse Suboxone are often persons who have been subject to opioid addiction for quite some time. Suboxone abuse may be carried out to decrease withdrawal symptoms with the use of opioid drugs of their choosing or trying to get high. A few possible adverse effects of Suboxone overdose include weakness, slurred speech, shallow breathing, severe fatigue, and blurred vision. When taking Suboxone, alcohol ought to be avoided because combining alcohol and Suboxone can have risky side effects and may even lead to death.

Suboxone Is Not a Solution for Long-Term Recovery

Irrespective of the detox benefits which Suboxone has, it is not a solution for recovering in the long run. Suboxone is a method of replacing drugs. When someone is facing difficulties with an addiction, replacing that addiction with a different one is very harmful. Suboxone aids in reducing cravings, getting rid of the “high” gotten from opioid drugs and reducing withdrawal symptoms. All these benefits are short-term and immediate. Suboxone is meant for short-term use, but it is rather unfortunate that they usually use it long-term. Using Suboxone for a long period of time hinders the ability of that person to be truly relieved from the psychological and physical effects which addiction has. There are several ways of helping someone who is facing difficulties with opioid addiction which do not involve substituting one drug for the other.

Becoming a Suboxone Addict

Suboxone aids in reducing cravings, getting rid of the “high” gotten from opioid drugs and reducing withdrawal symptoms. Even though they are detox benefits, the person can turn into a Suboxone addict. Even when taken following prescriptions, Suboxone can be addictive. Suboxone isn’t meant for everybody. Suboxone can’t solve drug abuse in the long run. Suboxone is a method of replacing drugs. There are several other methods of helping someone who is facing difficulties with opioid addiction.

Contact us via the number 1-855-998-5278 now if you know anyone who is a victim of drug or alcohol abuse. Our knowledgeable and reliable staff will get to you promptly. Visit Our Homepage

Contact Us