Changing the Stigma of Addiction

One of the most haunting aspects of living life as an individual recovering from an addiction is the fact that millions of people live in ignorance as to what addiction actually is. It is quite unfortunate that the minds of many Americans have been twisted into believing that addiction is something that only happens to the dregs of society, instead of the truth: addiction can happen to anyone.

The stigma of addiction is an issue that has plagued America for years, and while there have been substantial efforts to reverse it, it is up those of us that have suffered through it, triumphed over it, and moved on from it to increase awareness about the horrors of addiction, and the devastating effects misunderstanding it can bring on individuals and communities.

Addiction is not an individual, nor does it define an individual. Much like any other disease, addiction is a sickness that an individual develops over time, and treatment plans must be followed in order to recover from it. Individuals that suffer from addiction do exhibit symptoms that are both psychological and physical, but these symptoms can be reversed with the proper care and recovery lifestyle. Noting that addiction is a disease removes the power of inflammatory words used to describe those afflicted with it.

For instance, saying someone is “dirty” or “clean” in reference to whether or not an individual has used a substance, for instance, suggests that their disease somehow defines them and affects their cleanliness when addiction has nothing to do with cleanliness at all. Furthermore, referring to an individual as an “addict” or “druggie” dehumanizes them and suggests that their affliction somehow defines their value as a person, which couldn’t be further from the truth. Addressing addiction as the disease it is is the first step to defining power over it and eliminating these wrong assumptions.

Addiction can affect anyone. The vast majority of the American populace has consumed an illegal substance or alcoholic beverage, more than likely without the slightest idea of the propensity it had to wreak havoc on their lives for years to come. Their not getting addicted was as much of their doing as another’s getting addicted was of his own. The fact of the matter is that addiction can claim anyone, and it pays to understand that in order to fight the damaging stigmas of addiction.

At The Last House, we focus on turning men into gentlemen by championing collaboration, brotherhood, and respect. We offer long-term care after primary treatment, and our men go on to become pillars of their respective communities when they leave us. All men can become gentlemen. After treatment, we’re here to help you with that. Call (855)998-5278 for help today.

Last House

The Last House mission is to provide a safe, fun, program-oriented setting where residents can find purpose, progress, and build a foundation for a life that is not only free of drugs and alcohol, but flourishing in all aspects. The Last House sober livings staff consist of active members of the Los Angeles Sober Living recovery community and come with years of experience, professional backgrounds, counseling certifications and various expertise in health, wellness and employment services.