Are There Los Angeles Mental Health Treatment Facilities That Help With Depression?

Are there Los Angeles mental health treatment facilities that help with depression?

More than ever, we can all understand what it feels like to feel sad when we are under stress from circumstances in our life or the world around us. But it can be hard to know when feeling down crosses the lines over into depression. Figuring out if you are battling clinical depression can be confusing, and a Los Angeles mental health treatment facility can help you sort through your symptoms. By working with a professional, you’ll receive an objective opinion and, if needed, begin to develop a treatment plan. More often than not, we spend time researching symptoms on the internet and try to diagnose ourselves. If you ever feel like you’re struggling please reach out to a mental health professional.

 At The Last House, we understand how difficult it can be to navigate depression and its treatment. We are here to help you learn more about your mental health and any treatment you might need. 

What Is Depression?

Depression is more than a feeling of sadness, although that can be a part of it. Depression is a mental health disorder defined by loss of interest in previously enjoyed activities, a depressed mood, and an inability to carry out daily life activities. Depression is sometimes referred to as a major depressive disorder or as clinical depression. While it can be associated with significant life events such as losing a loved one, this is not always the case. Depression may be brought on by other conditions such as pregnancy, childbirth, or psychosis. In other cases, depression may arise without a precipitating event or factor. Only a licensed medical professional can diagnose depression.

Common Symptoms of Depression to Watch Out For

While sadness is what we think of most when we talk about depression, there are many other symptoms. If you are suffering from depression, you will experience a wide range of symptoms, including anxiety, loss of interest in activities, inability to concentrate, extreme sleepiness, insomnia, apathy, hunger, or lack of appetite. As you assess your depression, think about how long you have been experiencing symptoms and how these symptoms are affecting your life. If you recently experienced the loss of a loved one, a home, or a job, you may have a few weeks of feeling down. However, if the feelings of sadness continue beyond two to three weeks and are accompanied by other symptoms, it might be time to talk to a professional. While some who experience depression also have thoughts of suicide, this is not true of everyone who has depression. 

It’s important to note that depression presents differently in different people; not everyone will have the same symptoms.  While women typically present with feelings of sadness, worthlessness, and guilt, men may exhibit fatigue, irritability, and anger. Older adults may be less likely to admit to their symptoms. Teens may act out and get into trouble. All those affected by depression are at risk of using drugs or alcohol as a way to cope with their symptoms. It is pretty common for those dealing with mental health issues to self-medicate.  

Get Help With Depression at a Los Angeles Mental Health Treatment Facility

The Last House is a network of structured sober living homes in the heart of West Los Angeles. We believe in providing our clients with the tools to have a meaningful life and participate in their sobriety.  Activities such as service commitments, sober parties, conventions, dances, and house outings are all a part of helping you learn how to have fun in sobriety.  Composed of active members of the Los Angeles Sober Living community, our staff is familiar with many recovery support groups in the area.  If you’re wondering how to create your sober life, The Last House is here to help. 

Stimulant Drug Examples: What Do They Look Like?

What do drug stimulants look like?

Not all drugs are the same. Drugs are categorized into different classes, including narcotics, depressants, hallucinogens, and stimulants. Each drug class is made up of various drugs and has different effects. Depressants include benzodiazepines and alcohol and, as the name indicates, depress you mentally and physically when you take them. Hallucinogens include drugs like LSD and PCP, resulting in hallucinations. Stimulant drug examples include methamphetamines, amphetamines, and cocaine. Some stimulants are legal and prescribed, while others are not. As the name suggests, stimulants stimulate you mentally and physically. At

The Last House, we know all about the various drugs that can be taken, their effects, and the resulting withdrawals. 

Stimulant Drug Examples

Stimulants speed up the body and the mind. Someone who has taken stimulants will often talk much faster and appear to be moving much more quickly. Some stimulants such as amphetamines and certain methamphetamines can be legally prescribed. Prescribed stimulant drugs examples include Adderall, Ritalin, Didrex, and Meridia. Illegal stimulant drug examples include crystal methamphetamine, cocaine, and synthetic cathinones such as bath salts. While all stimulants act to speed up the body’s systems, the different stimulants can look different. 

Cocaine, only available illegally, will usually appear as a white powder. However, crack cocaine looks like small white rocks. Cocaine has many street names, including coke, crack, crank, flake, snow, and soda. It can be snorted, smoked, or dissolved in water and injected. Most who use cocaine experience a rush of euphoria and will binge on the drug until they run out. Following a cocaine binge, users will typically crash, sleeping for several days until they begin to experience cravings again. Cocaine, in any amount, is very dangerous. Cocaine use can result in irregular heart rhythms, increased blood pressure, increased heart rate, restlessness, irritability, anxiety, stroke, cardiac arrest, and death. 

In its legal form, methamphetamine is prescribed in pill form as Desoxyn to treat ADHD and obesity. In its illegal form, methamphetamines can be taken as a pill or may come as a powder. Created by mixing the prescription drug with over-the-counter drugs, crystal meth is another illegal form of methamphetamine that resembles glass fragments. Methamphetamines and amphetamines can be swallowed, snorted, smoked, or infected. These drugs are highly addictive and have many street names, including speed, ice, tweak, trash, and chalk.  

Like most stimulants, methamphetamines cause increased heart rate, blood pressure, body temperature, and breathing rate, as well as agitation, anxiety, and paranoia. Because of their highly addictive nature, many individuals began taking more of the drug to achieve the same high, resulting in convulsions, cardiac arrest, stroke, or death. 

In addition to methamphetamines, amphetamines, and cocaine, there are also designer drugs designed to simulate stimulants. Designer drug stimulant examples include bath salts and khat. Bath salts, which look much like bath salts or crystal meth, mimic the effects of crystal meth. Khat, a stimulant drug made from leaves and twigs, has cathine and cathinone as its active ingredients and can be drunk as a tea, sprinkled on food, or smoked. Also known as oat, qat, African salad, or catha, khat has similar effects to other stimulants. In addition to the expected results of stimulants, it can also result in manic behavior with grandiose delusions, cardiac complications, nightmares, depression, suicidal ideation, and gastric disorders. Designer drug stimulants are often sold online or in smoke shops, which results in people believing that they are less dangerous, but this is incorrect. 

How to Get Help With a Stimulant Addiction

If you or a loved one have been using drugs, you’ll find many options available for the road to recovery. The Last House is here to help keep them on that road. We are a network of sober living homes in the heart of West Los Angeles. We believe in providing our clients with the tools to have a meaningful life and participate in their sobriety.  Activities such as service commitments, sober parties, conventions, dances, and house outings are all a part of helping you learn how to have fun in sobriety.  If you’re creating a sober life or supporting someone who is, The Last House is here to help. Contact us today. 

Types of Support Groups for Those Affected by Someone’s Addiction

Types of support groups for those affected by someone’s addiction

Loving someone who suffers from addiction is a heartbreaking and isolating proposition. Whether it is a partner, child, spouse, family member, or friend, you will likely feel frustrated and even alone. While others are bragging about a loved one’s accomplishments, you may sit silently struggling with what to do next. Rather than remaining isolated, you might explore the different types of support groups available to those impacted by someone else’s addiction. Hearing the experiences of others who are similarly situated and speaking openly about your own can lessen the feelings of isolation. Additionally, you may hear solutions that help you as you face up to a loved one’s addiction. At The Last House, we understand how confusing and isolating it can be to love someone struggling with addiction. We can help you navigate the types of support groups so that you can support yourself and your loved one during this time.  

Al-Anon and Alateen

Founded in 1951 by Lois W., the wife of the founder of Alcoholics Anonymous, Al-Anon provides support to the friends and families of alcoholics. While it was initially founded to support those who loved an alcoholic, all those who love someone facing addiction are welcome. Like Alcoholics Anonymous, Al-Anon relies on its own set of twelve steps and the option for members to work with a sponsor. Al-Anon is a peer support group; everyone in attendance has been impacted by a family member or loved one facing active alcoholism or active addiction. Meetings are held all over the world, in-person and online. Also available is Alateen, founded in 1957 to support teens affected by someone’s alcoholism or addiction. Neither group is focused on helping anyone with their alcohol or drug problem. Instead, it is solely focused on helping those affected by someone else’s drug and alcohol use. 

Adult Children of Alcoholics

Adult Children of Alcoholics/Dysfunctional Families (ACA) is aimed at men and women who grew up in dysfunctional homes.  ACA is a twelve-step program that also incorporated “The Laundry List,” a list of traits found in adult children. Much like Al-Anon and Alateen, ACA is a peer support group that relies on twelve steps, twelve traditions, and a sponsorship system. ACA is a peer support recovery group that originated within Al-Anon but focuses more on the effects of being raised in an alcoholic or dysfunctional household. ACA uses a Big Red Book rather than the Big Blue Book of Alcoholics Anonymous. 

Families Anonymous

Families Anonymous, while not associated with AA, Al-Anon, or ACA, is another twelve-step program available to those who love someone struggling with addiction. Founded in 1971 in California, Families Anonymous is for those relatives and friends who suffer from a substance abuse or related behavioral problem. Families Anonymous relies on twelve steps, twelve traditions, and meetings to assist those who love someone with a substance or behavioral problem. 

Supporting Someone in Addiction and Addiction Recovery

If you discover that someone you love has been using drugs or alcohol, you’ll find a world of options available to get them on the road to recover. The Last House is here to help keep them on that road. We are a network of sober living homes in the heart of West Los Angeles. We believe in providing our clients with the tools to have a meaningful life and participate in their sobriety.  Activities such as service commitments, sober parties, conventions, dances, and house outings are all a part of helping you learn how to have fun in sobriety.  If you’re helping your teen create a sober life, The Last House is here to help. Contact us today. 

How to Heal From Codependency and Repair Relationships

How to heal from codependency and repair relationships

Relationships are complex enough without the added complications of addiction and codependency. Loving a person who is fighting an active addiction is heartbreaking and exhausting. You may find yourself having an entire spectrum of emotions as the person you love  fights their addiction. You may feel like you are on the most extended road trip with multiple forks in the road but no map to guide you. Relationships with addiction are a breeding ground for unhealthy behaviors like codependency. Once the person you love finds their way to recovery, you’ll be left wondering how to heal from the codependency. At The Last House, we understand the strained relationships associated with addiction, and we can help your family heal the wounds created during active addiction.

How to Heal From Codependency as the Parent

As the parent of an addict, your child’s addiction may have taken over your life. Trying to save a loved one from active addiction can be all-consuming, especially your child. You want to protect your children from harm. Additionally, you’ve probably spent a lot of energy and effort trying to help them avoid the consequences of their addiction in an attempt to preserve their future. Finally, you likely have some level of resentment related to any manipulation that occurred during your child’s active addiction. One of the most important things to realize is that your child has responsibility for healing their addiction; it is not your role to save them. Any addict, no matter the age, must want to recover for any help received to be effective. Still, it’s hard to know where the boundaries are or how to create them.  Fortunately, you will find that you are not alone.  Peer support groups such as Al-Anon will provide you with the space and the tools to heal from codependency. Likewise, family and individual therapy will help you in your journey of healing. 

How to Heal From Codependency as the Recovering Addict

Nearly every person in recovery can look back at their active addiction and realize the number of times they manipulated, used, or lied to their loved ones. When you are active in your addiction, your focus is on using, and everything else becomes superfluous. Sadly, this only gets worse as you get deeper into your addiction, and you may not even remember all of the specifics of what you have done. Part of the recovery journey is to heal the relationships in your life. Sometimes this is done by creating healthier relationships, and sometimes this is done by ending relationships.  Working with a therapist and attending peer support recovery groups can help you to determine what steps are needed in your life. One of the basic tenets of recovery is to keep your side of the street clean, which simply means that you can only be responsible for your own behavior. Understanding this is critical for you to heal from codependency. If your parents have been rescuing you, saving you from consequences, and bearing the brunt of your addictive behavior, you have an opportunity in recovery to change those patterns. Being in recovery is about taking personal responsibility for your actions and your emotions. 

Sober Living at The Last House

The Last House Sober Living is a network of structured sober living homes in southern California. We believe in providing our clients with the tools to have a meaningful life filled with healthier relationships.  We’ll help you learn how to live and have fun in sobriety through service commitments, sober parties, conventions, dances, and house outings.  Our experienced staff is composed of active members of the Los Angeles Sober Living community. If you’re wondering where to start to create your sober life, The Last House is here to help. 

What Does It Mean to Relapse? Signs to Look Out for In Your Loved One

Drug and Alcohol addiction relapse rehabilitation treatment program

It is heartbreaking to watch someone you love struggle with active addiction. It’s also hard to know how to best support them through early sobriety and long-term recovery.  When your loved one is in early sobriety, you will hear a lot of talk about relapse and relapse prevention. But what does it mean to relapse? Relapsing involves picking back up drugs, alcohol, or both after having gotten sober. Relapse can happen at any time in sobriety, and that’s why relapse prevention is critical. The Last House is here to help with relapse prevention and support your loved one as they create their sober life.

What Is a Relapse?

While relapse occurs when someone starts using drugs or alcohol again, most will admit that the relapse began in their minds long before the use began. So what is a relapse? Is it the taking of any substance or just the drug of choice? The answer is it depends. There are those within the recovery community that adheres to a rigid set of standards for sobriety. The ones in this camp believe that the taking of any mind-altering substance equals relapse. Others believe that avoiding the drug of choice while taking other substances is acceptable. Finally, some strike a balance and feel that substances prescribed by a doctor do not constitute a relapse if the medication is taken exactly as prescribed. 

What defines a relapse is personal. What’s more important to know is that relapses, when they happen, are not a reason for shame and do not have to last long. While relapsing can be dangerous depending on the drug used, it can also be educational. Relapsing does not eliminate the work that has been done in sobriety. Instead, a relapse should be examined for the lessons that can be used going forward. 

Who Is Vulnerable to Relapse?

To some extent, everyone who is in recovery is vulnerable to relapse. Addiction is not a disease that vanishes. While it often gets easier over time, long-term sobriety still requires work. To reduce the risk of relapse in early sobriety, some basics help, including: 

  • Making choices that support physical and emotional well-being
  • Having a stable and safe place to live
  • Engaging in meaningful daily activities
  • Building supportive relationships and social networks

Those in sobriety must also learn to identify and recognize their triggers. Developing a plan to address triggers, stress, and other life events is critical to long-term sobriety. 

Relapse Warning Signs to Look Out for in My Loved One

It can be challenging to recognize a relapse, especially in early recovery. Many in early recovery are more emotional and moody simply because they are not using. It is not uncommon for those in early recovery to have some bouts of anger or to cry during the first several months.  Recovery is not linear, and each month will bring new challenges to face. However, the signs of relapse will often be similar to the signs that your loved one was using in the first place. Moodiness may be expected, but slurred words, pinpoint pupils, and marked personality changes are not. As with many things, you have to keep the lines of communication open and trust your gut. 

Live Sober With the Help of The Last House

The Last House Sober Living is a network of sober living homes in the heart of West Los Angeles. We believe in providing our clients with the tools to have a meaningful life, participate in their sobriety, and avoid relapse.  Activities such as service commitments, sober parties, conventions, dances, and house outings are all a part of helping you learn how to have fun in sobriety.  If you’re wondering where to start to create your sober life, The Last House is here to help. 

A Guide to Understanding Drug Addiction

Understanding Drug Addiction

Drug addiction may be one of the most confusing and frustrating diseases. It is hard to imagine why anyone would continue to use drugs and alcohol as their entire life is falling apart.  Understanding drug addiction is not simple because it often defies logic. Watching someone face consequences like the loss of family, arrest, financial ruin, and more while continuing to use drugs is heartbreaking. The key to it all is to know that the one who is active in their addiction is not in their right mind. Fortunately, this begins to change as they get sober, and then it’s time to rebuild.  That’s why The Last House is here; we’re here to help those coming back from addiction create a sober life. 

What Is Addiction?

Addiction is defined as a chronic, relapsing disorder characterized by compulsive drug or alcohol use despite any adverse consequences.  Drug and alcohol use typically begins with experimentation or first use. While we often think of this in terms of illicit drugs, the drugs may be legal. A person may be prescribed opioids for long-term pain or may begin using alcohol. The user may stop there or may move on to regular use. The danger begins when the use continues, becomes riskier, and leads to dependence. If you find yourself drinking while drunk or high, you’re engaging in more dangerous use. If you find you cannot stop or taper down without experiencing withdrawal symptoms, you have crossed over to physical dependence on the substances you have been using. Not everyone who uses or experiments with drugs and alcohol will become addicted. Researchers do not entirely understand why, and this is why understanding addiction is so complicated. 

What Is the Best Way to Treat Addiction?

Treating your addiction depends on multiple factors. The drugs you have been using, how you have ingested them, and your use history will significantly impact treatment decisions. Treatment is about more than the drugs, though, because the drugs are typically used to cope when poor coping skills exist. Maybe you turned to drugs as a way to self-medicate your anxiety disorder or because you couldn’t cope with past trauma. Perhaps you found drugs as a way to self-medicate your depression or because you grew up in a family where someone normalized drug use. All of these circumstances will be taken into account as you seek treatment for your addiction.  Researchers continue to explore the effectiveness of different treatments and find that twelve-step mutual aid recovery groups and recovery housing are both very effective. 

Can Addiction Ever Be Cured?

While it can never truly be cured, addiction can be managed quite well. The United States Surgeon General reports that approximately fifty percent of adults who once suffered from substance use disorder are considered in stable remission. This represents about twenty-five million people, once active in their addictions, who have now been sober for more than a year. That’s good news for those early in sobriety; recovery is possible. However, recovery is a lifelong endeavor.  Addiction, like many other diseases, requires ongoing care and attention for remission to continue. 

Reach Out to the Last House Today for More Information About Drug Addiction

The Last House Sober Living is a network of sober living homes in the heart of West Los Angeles. We believe in providing our clients with the tools to have a meaningful life and participate in their own sobriety.  Activities such as service commitments, sober parties, conventions, dances, and house outings are all a part of helping you learn how to have fun in sobriety.  If you’re wondering where to start to create your sober life, The Last House is here to help. 

How to Stop Enabling a Drug Addict

Stop Enabling a Drug Addict

Loving a drug addict is hard. We want to help and support the people that we love. But when does loving a drug addict turn into enabling a drug addict? It can be a fine line and defining the boundaries can feel impossible. A loved one consumed by an addiction may seem like a completely different person. Your instinct may be to save them by any means necessary, but that may not always have the results you’re wanting. A person wrapped up in their addiction is not thinking clearly and their decision making may not be logical. At The Last House, we can help you understand what steps to take when you are ready to stop enabling your loved one. 

What Does It Mean to Enable a Drug Addict?

Enabling a drug addict involves engaging in activities that support their continuing drug or alcohol abuse. While it can be something as simple as providing financial support or housing to someone addicted to drugs and alcohol, it can be much more. Other forms of enabling are more subtle and are focused on helping the addict face the consequences of their addiction.  Enabling can take the form of justifying your loved one’s behavior, minimizing the impact of their substance use, or denying that there is a problem. Maybe you’re helping to protect their image with their coworkers or family friends or taking care of any resulting problems. Perhaps you have tried controlling your loved one’s addiction or lecturing them about it.  No matter what your enabling looks like, it likely involves your not expressing how you are being impacted by their use. And holding in those feelings can lead to you taking on more responsibilities for them and ultimately feeling superior to the addict in your life. Addiction couples with enabling changes the whole dynamic of any relationship. 

How Do I Stop Enabling My Loved One?

Helping a loved one face their own addiction can be difficult and heartbreaking. You’ve likely seen the television shows and movies that depict “tough love”.  It’s called tough love because it can be hard to set boundaries even when they are set with the hope of helping an addict face their addiction. The first step is to accept that there is a problem and to identify your role in the problem. If you can identify your enabling actions, you can stop enabling and allow your loved one to face the consequences of their substance use. For example, maybe you have taken over all of the chores inside and outside of the house because your partner has been intoxicated, high, or hungover too often. Instead of carrying the load alone, start asking them to share the responsibilities. Likewise, stop covering for your loved one with other members of your family, friends, and their coworkers. While you may feel like you’re putting them in danger of failing, you’ll want to remember that it’s not your job to save them. You’re trying to change the trajectory of their disease by allowing them to face the consequences you’ve been protecting them from. Instead of enabling them to keep using, now you’re enabling them to face the truth of their using. 

Sober Living at The Last House

The Last House Sober Living is a network of structured sober living homes in the heart of West Los Angeles. We believe in providing our clients with the tools to have a meaningful life and participate in their sobriety.  Activities such as service commitments, sober parties, conventions, dances, and house outings are all a part of helping learn how to have fun in sobriety. If you’re wondering where to start creating your sober life, The Last House is here to help!

What to Do After You Leave Drug Rehab

What to Do After You Leave Drug Rehab

Once you’ve admitted you have a problem, go to rehab, and get sober, you may be wondering what to do after drug rehab. It’s a bit like graduating from school and finding yourself not knowing what the next step should be. In rehab, you’ve likely learned that you need to change your life and your surroundings.  But how does that work?  We know how overwhelming it can seem to change everything.  That’s why The Last House is here. We want to help you as you start to create your sober life. 

What to Do After Drug Rehab

It is critical to realize that there is no magic action that will keep you sober after rehab. Instead, it is the collective results of many different steps.  Much like rehab has various components, so does recovery and sobriety.  It may take you some time to find the right mix of actions that work for you, and that’s not only okay, but it’s also expected.  You are building a new life, and you will not have all of the answers. That said, there are some things that you can do that will help set you up for success while you are figuring it all out, including:

  • Making choices that support physical and emotional well-being
  • Having a stable and safe place to live
  • Engaging in meaningful daily activities
  • Building supportive relationships and social networks

One of the first things you can do after drug rehab is to find a sober living house.  Early recovery can be challenging. A sober living house can provide you with structure and stability to support your recovery.  At the same time, living in a sober house can also enable you to meet others in recovery and begin to form a support network. Many sober homes will host different activities to help you discover how to have fun in recovery.  Many who have found themselves in active addiction have stopped participating in any activities except getting and using the drug of choice.

While it’s essential to learn how to have fun in recovery, it’s also important to begin to take on responsibilities again.  A great place to start is by getting a job and learning how to support ourselves financially.  Depending on the job, you might find a sense of purpose within the work and a sense of accomplishment.  You will also begin to make friends at work and have a social support network that is not built around drugs and alcohol.

Balancing It All    

You might be wondering how you’re going to stay sober with a life filled with work and fun.  Where does recovery fit? Well, in addition to living at a sober house, you can also participate in recovery meetings.  Most, if not all, twelve-step programs have in-person and online meetings that you can attend.  There are also other recovery groups such as SMART Recovery, Refuge Recovery, and a wide variety of online communities that can support your sober life.  And, the good news is that you don’t have to pick just one.  You can experiment with attending different groups and different meetings within the same group until you find the ones that work best for you. 

Reach Out to Us Today at the Last House 

The Last House Sober Living is a network of sober living homes in the heart of West Los Angeles. We believe in providing our clients with the tools to have a meaningful life and participate in their own sobriety.  Activities such as service commitments, sober parties, conventions, dances, and house outings are all a part of helping you learn how to have fun in sobriety.  If you’re wondering where to start to create your sober life, The Last House is here to help! 

Four Fun Sober Activities for Men

fun sober activities for men

When we’re active in our addictions, we don’t often think of recovery as fun.  We believe that there can’t possibly be any fun, sober activities.  Instead, we picture our future sober lives as an endless marathon of recovery meetings, work, and fulfilling the responsibilities we’ve avoided.  We imagine sobriety as a life without color, without laughter, and without fun.  But it doesn’t have to be that way and, at The Last House, we can show you what sober people do for fun. 

Four Fun Sober Activities For Men

One of the saddest parts of addiction is the loss of self.  While you’re active in your addiction, you likely have only one interest. Your primary purpose becomes getting and using your substance of choice.  Even if you participate in other activities, you probably schedule them around your addiction.  Once you get sober, you may not even know what you like to do. You may not have spent a lot of time exploring fun, sober activities, and you might wonder what sober people do for fun. The good news is that there isn’t just one answer, but getting sober puts you in a position to start exploring. 

Your next question might be where to start, and here are some suggestions:

  • Basketball
  • Snowboarding and Skiing Trips
  • Surfing
  • Group Outings

What you might notice about this shortlist is that these activities are all much more possible sober!  It’s much more comfortable and less dangerous to engage in sports such as basketball, skiing, snowboarding, and surfing when you’re not high or drunk. Not only is your chance of injury reduced, but you also might enjoy yourself. You may have thought that you’re not a sports person or that you’re not really into exercise, but you might give yourself a chance to try.  You might surprise yourself. 

In addition to sports, group outings to areas such as the beach, museums, or other places can be quite enjoyable. When was the last time you explored the space around you and saw what was available to do? Imagine walking through a museum with no purpose other than to look at the art and enjoy it.  Consider the possibility of walking along the coast and looking out to the ocean, just taking it all in. Picture yourself at a restaurant or a picnic with friends, enjoying their company and the food.  You may or may not enjoy every activity that you try, but sometimes the fun is in the trying. 

What sober people do for fun is to live.  By changing the focus from drugs to living, life is so much more fun.  You might find that you love to golf, or you might find that you hate it.  Either way, you’ll have tried something new.  With each new activity that you try, you’ll start to learn the things you enjoy doing, and you’ll likely begin to form friendships with those who want to engage in similar activities.  And one day, you’ll find yourself out having fun and wonder what it was about using that you thought was so great. 

Sober Living at the Last House

The Last House Sober Living is a network of structured sober living homes in the heart of West Los Angeles. We believe in providing our clients with the tools to have a meaningful life and participate in their sobriety.  Activities such as service commitments, sober parties, conventions, dances, and house outings are all a part of helping you learn how to have fun in sobriety.  Our staff,  composed of active members of the Los Angeles Sober Living community, have years of experience. If you’re wondering where to start creating your sober life, The Last House is here to help. 

Going to Sober Living for Addiction as a Young Man

We’re humans, and as humans, we’re conditioned to want more out of life. We want more fun, more adventure, more enjoyment. One of the incredible concepts about addiction recovery  is that it teaches us that we can have “more” and lead fulfilling lives while being sober and without using substances.

As a Los Angeles-based sober living facility, we understand that the world often defines being “sober” as a boring way to live life. Practically everything that’s considered “fun” seems to be tainted by drugs, alcohol, or both. It’s the way big industry makes money– and it’s also the reason why there are 278,544 drug and alcohol related deaths among men every year. Here at The Last House, we ascribe to a different idea of what living “sober” is. We believe that sober living means making a lifestyle change that transforms us into confident, independent men ready to make the most of our lives. We believe that by fostering brotherhood and community, the young men that come through our doors can take Los Angeles and the rest of the world by storm when they graduate. We believe that living sober is the absolute best version of life, and that nothing else really compares.

Getting sober at a sober living facility helps us learn how to deal with life’s challenges as they happen, with the support of brothers and mentors to help us make the right decisions. When we focus on getting sober, we realize that we don’t have time to think about “what we may be missing”– and we really don’t have any desire to. Truth be told, with countless activities here in Los Angeles, we actually find that we’re able to both be more productive men and have more enjoyable and fulfilling experiences when we’re not using substances.

Sober living isn’t just a halfway point between addiction treatment and life outside. With the resources provided and the tools created here in the sober living community, young men in Los Angeles, New York, DC, and all over the country are learning how to make the most of their lives by realizing just how much strength they have without substances. Getting sober is a journey, not a sentence. It’s the most rewarding action you can take for yourself as a young man battling addiction, and sobriety will open up a world of opportunity that you never thought possible.

Here at The Last House sober living facility, we believe that getting sober is a gift, and we teach our young men to embrace the possibilities of a sober life. Situated in sunny Los Angeles, we provide a number of activities and resources for our men to learn responsibility, accountability, independence, and brotherhood. When our men leave The Last House, they’re not just not using. They’re leading more fulfilling lives than they’d ever imagined. Call us at 1-866-677-0090 to get started with The Last House today.