Let Your Feelings Fuel You

Let Your Feelings Fuel You

Ever notice how fierce competitors like to get slapped before the start of an intense fight? It’s not because they like the pain. It’s because the pain fuels them.

Sober living is a lot like that slap in the face. It’s gonna hurt like heck, but if we let it, it can make us even more amped up to go out and take control of our lives when we graduate. If we end up liking it, we’ll see gains in our lives like never before.

The Big Book is very direct about the importance of pain in recovery. “Pain is the admission price to a new life,” it says. It also says that eventually, we “begin to fear pain less, and desire humility more than ever.” Couldn’t get much clearer than that.

Sober living isn’t designed to hurt us, but it is designed to help us work out those kinks in our lives that we either thought no one knew about, or genuinely forgot about ourselves. Once we recover from addiction, we learn very quickly that there are things and people in this world that will stop at nothing to see us back where we were– helpless and on our backsides. If we don’t learn to trim ourselves of all of the extra mental and spiritual fat we put on in the years leading up to our substance use, it’s going to be quite difficult to get through some of the tough times we might face after graduation.

We do that by being real with each other in sober living. We’re accountable. We work as a unit. We learn respect, punctuality, and how to build the right kind of pride. We may feel picked on or like we can’t keep up with the demands and rigor that sober living requires, but we’ll never feel alone. Using these feelings to push ourselves to work harder, make smarter decisions, and step outside of our comfort zones is the only way to do things here. If our feelings aren’t fueling us, we’re doing something wrong.

Sober living is like P90X for our feelings. Ready. Set. Go.

The Last House is a premier men’s sober living facility based in West Los Angeles. We turn men into gentlemen by helping them build the skills and confidence they need to demolish the competition: the real world. Call 1-866-677-0090 to see how we can help you, your son, or your husband today!

Making Lessons out of “Losses”

Making Lessons out of “Losses”

Sober living wouldn’t be very effective if we didn’t feel comfortable screwing something up every once in a while. In fact, though sober living communities like The Last House are here to help us plot the right path to the real world, they also function as a great place to make the mistakes we simply couldn’t afford to make out there.

Why?

 

Because mistakes make us stronger, smarter, and better. The Big Book mentions mistakes eight times, and almost every time, it’s in encouraging us to do one thing: learn from them. Think about it- in just about everything we learn, mistakes are par for the course. Baby’s going to walk? He’s going to fall down first. Making the transition from a tricycle to a bicycle? Prepare for some scuffed knees. Driver’s permit time? More like time for some bumped orange cones.

 

If even the most fundamental lessons we learn in life are meant to be accompanied by mistakes, then why should sober living be different? It shouldn’t, and it isn’t. It’s okay to make mistakes in sober living. The important concept is learning from them.

 

The Big Book suggests we learn from our mistakes by analyzing them (“we [should] continue to take personal inventory and continue to set right any new mistakes as we go along.”) Here at The Last House, we add to that by making sure that we hold ourselves accountable to our brothers. We live in unity, and, as such, any mistake one man makes affects the team. This teaches us that every action we take affects more than just us, and that, no matter what, even in the wrong, we’ll always have someone to support us and lift us back up.

 

We can make lessons out of everything we do, but learning to make lessons out of mistakes in particular teaches us that our battles aren’t lost when we mess up, and that forward progress can be made even when we think we’re screwed.

Sober living doesn’t just teach us how to live as recovered men. It teaches us how to live as conquerors. Let’s slap a band-aid on and learn from our mistakes. When we put our minds to it, our forward progress can’t be stopped!

The Last House is a men’s sober living facility based in West Los Angeles. We know the tools men need to become recovery warriors, and we equip them everyday to take control of their lives and make gold where others said was bronze.

Call us at 1-866-677-0090 to get started today!

The First Step is the Hardest: Transitioning from Treatment to Living in Recovery

The First Step is the Hardest: Transitioning from Treatment to Living in Recovery

Addiction treatment is one of the most empowering experiences anyone can go through. You enter as a man on a mission, determined to make the most out of your opportunity and to truly rid yourself of addiction, once and for all. You work your program, participate, engage, and learn more about yourself in three months than you may have ever learned in years prior.  You make friends, and these people become the ones that help you get through some of the process that’s a little harder for you to digest. Then, in the span of just a few months, you’re done. You feel enlightened, energized, and ready to tackle anything world throws at you. Sometimes, however, in between tackling treatment and tackling the big wide world on your own, you need a little extra push. Concepts that might have sounded awesome in theory at the treatment facility might seem  a little more difficult outside of that environment.

That’s where our team at The Last House comes in. We’re a sober living house that specializes in making that transition stage not just important, but valuable.

It’s hard enough to take the first step in anything, but recovery can be an even trickier process than most. The world is a big place, and there’s so much out there that we could never prepare ourselves for everything, no matter how hard we tried. Frankly, if you leap right from addiction treatment to life on your own, it can be hard to tell if you’re going to be alright. Things shouldn’t be this way, though. There shouldn’t be that degree of uncertainty that makes us wonder whether treatment was worth it, if we are going to be able to resist temptation, or if we have what it takes to apply the principles we learned in treatment to the great unknown. Our job at The Last House is to take that fear, and to turn it into excellence. We are here to make you the very best version of yourself, by putting you in an environment where you can learn from potential mistakes, get to know other men that are also transitioning out of treatment, and form lasting bonds with peers that will be there for you for years to come. We help build you up, so you can help build communities. With us, transitioning from treatment to recovery is not a chore, nor is it nerve-wracking or fear-inducing. It is, quite literally, an experience of a lifetime.

How do we change your transition process?

The National Institute on Drug Abuse says that “generally, for residential or outpatient treatment, participation for less than 90 days is of limited effectiveness, and treatment lasting significantly longer is recommended for maintaining positive outcomes.” Basically, it takes some time to do recovery the right way, no matter if you stay at a facility for the duration of your program, or if you recover at home. Many times, addiction is an illness that has been with us for years before we get treatment, and while intensive treatment can definitely help us get rid of the illness, it takes trained professionals from a sober living house to pick up where treatment ends and help guide us to where life begins. At The Last House, we are focused on doing just that, specifically by building men into  independent, collaborative, confident gentlemen that are both intuitive and discerning. We don’t spend a lot of time sugarcoating things, because that isn’t what the world is like. We encourage transparency, honesty, integrity, and, most importantly, brotherhood. These are the pillars of who we are, and they become the pillars of every single man that walks through our doors. We change the transition process by allowing our men the freedom to make mistakes, correct them, and learn how to do it better than the next time. The strong men in our programs don’t have to worry about falling, because even if they stumble a little bit, they have their brothers right beside to pick them up.

We’re here to make a community– a tribe, really– of men that are so well-prepared to get back out into the world that when they do, they truly don’t end up as just normal, contributing citizens. They are extraordinary. They are confident, bold, and courageous. They are self–aware, empathetic, and a joy to be around. We turn the transition process into a training ground. Men enter, perhaps unsure, maybe a little timid, and leave true warriors, having overcome addiction and ready to take on any challenges life may throw at them.

Everything that we do here at The Last House is tailored for our clients to find renewed purpose in life, even more than they had before they were addicted. We focus on aligning mind, body, and soul, and on the importance of self worth, self-reliance, and self-awareness. The brotherhood that we foster in our men is organic, and leads to incredible results. Men need other men to help them make such a big life change. It empowers them, stirs them up, and lets them know that things are ok, because the ones around them aren’t going anywhere anytime soon.

It’s hard to put into words the enormous impact that we have on our clients, but, suffice to say, there’s a reason we are Los Angeles’ premium men’s sober living facility. If you’re looking for direction, guidance, and brotherhood in your life, look no further. Call The Last House sober living today at (855)998-5278!

Changing the Stigma of Addiction

One of the most haunting aspects of living life as an individual recovering from an addiction is the fact that millions of people live in ignorance as to what addiction actually is. It is quite unfortunate that the minds of many Americans have been twisted into believing that addiction is something that only happens to the dregs of society, instead of the truth: addiction can happen to anyone.

The stigma of addiction is an issue that has plagued America for years, and while there have been substantial efforts to reverse it, it is up those of us that have suffered through it, triumphed over it, and moved on from it to increase awareness about the horrors of addiction, and the devastating effects misunderstanding it can bring on individuals and communities.

Addiction is not an individual, nor does it define an individual. Much like any other disease, addiction is a sickness that an individual develops over time, and treatment plans must be followed in order to recover from it. Individuals that suffer from addiction do exhibit symptoms that are both psychological and physical, but these symptoms can be reversed with the proper care and recovery lifestyle. Noting that addiction is a disease removes the power of inflammatory words used to describe those afflicted with it.

For instance, saying someone is “dirty” or “clean” in reference to whether or not an individual has used a substance, for instance, suggests that their disease somehow defines them and affects their cleanliness when addiction has nothing to do with cleanliness at all. Furthermore, referring to an individual as an “addict” or “druggie” dehumanizes them and suggests that their affliction somehow defines their value as a person, which couldn’t be further from the truth. Addressing addiction as the disease it is is the first step to defining power over it and eliminating these wrong assumptions.

Addiction can affect anyone. The vast majority of the American populace has consumed an illegal substance or alcoholic beverage, more than likely without the slightest idea of the propensity it had to wreak havoc on their lives for years to come. Their not getting addicted was as much of their doing as another’s getting addicted was of his own. The fact of the matter is that addiction can claim anyone, and it pays to understand that in order to fight the damaging stigmas of addiction.

At The Last House, we focus on turning men into gentlemen by championing collaboration, brotherhood, and respect. We offer long-term care after primary treatment, and our men go on to become pillars of their respective communities when they leave us. All men can become gentlemen. After treatment, we’re here to help you with that. Call (855)998-5278 for help today.

Recovering with Grace

addiction recovery

Many who have successfully recovered from addiction count the mental struggle as one the most taxing of the entire recovery process. Our mindset is of utmost importance when it comes to determining whether or not our journey will be a successful one. The most important question in determining an individual’s aptitude for a successful recovery becomes one of whether or not they are truly mentally and spiritually ready for the process. While there is no definitive way to answer this, there are steps that can be taken to bolster readiness and ensure as smooth of a journey as possible.

In learning to recover with grace, it is important that you fundamentally understand that your treatment was just one step in a long recovery process. A lot of individuals are not ever able to truly recover because they, for whatever reason, cannot accept the fact that a lot more work must be done after treatment to make sure they’re ready for the everyday world. If you don’t accept this, it’s easy to play the blame game post-treatment and forget that treatment can only go so far. While shifting the blame on treatment may help to temporarily assuage guilt or responsibility, it contributes to the wrong mindset. If an individual opts for recovery, he must understand exactly what it is he is getting himself into. At The Last House, our sober living facility programs provide that baseline knowledge, and significantly help with the process of adjusting from treatment to everyday life.

The second step in recovering with grace is acknowledging that recovery is not an overnight process. Many people acknowledge that they are still recovering from addiction decades after treatment. Though they may not have touched a substance in years, they understand that every day presents an opportunity to get a little stronger, and that recovery is a never-ending process. Likewise, those that are just beginning the recovery process must not anticipate total transformation in a day’s time. Preparing yourself for a gradual process ensures that your mind stays focused on goals and milestones of the journey.

The third step in recovering with grace is ensuring that you keep your mind, soul, and body aligned throughout the entire process. While this is significantly easier to do in the care of a treatment facility, it can become rather difficult outside of the facility, when in the comfort (or confines) of your own home. That’s where The Last House comes in. Our sober living facility bridges that gap between treatment and home, and provides the tools you need to stay aligned throughout your transition. Here, you’ll learn just how much remembering to eat healthy, staying active both physically and mentally, and setting attainable goals for your physical, spiritual, and mental well-being can positively impact your recovery. Recovery is very much mental, but it also requires that the rest of your faculties be at peak performance.

Recovering with grace starts with step one: making the transition from treatment to the rest of your life. The Last House is here to help you not just make that transition, but to make the most of it. Call us at (855)998-5278 to start your life changing path today!